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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I plan to replace much of my standing rigging soon. I am relatively sure that the rig is original stainless from 1968. It is an Islander Bahama 24', a simple masthead sloop with an Aluminum alloy mast. ISLANDER BAHAMA 24 - SAILBOAT PORTAL (specs. English)
It is currently rigged the way you would expect an old masthead sloop to be: Stainless swaged terminals to bronze turnbuckles on stainless chainplates. Corrosion does not seem to be a big issue as of right now. Once upon a time this boat must have been sailed in the ocean (Originally from Hoquiam, WA), because there is an insulated backstay. I have no such plans, yet. I am going to do away with the insulated backstay, and do a straight run of galvanized. I am also planning on getting a new stainless headstay, as I use hanked on sails.

I am going to carefully inspect all of the fittings, and I already have spotted a few that really need to be replaced. Right now, I am trying to decide on something:

How should I terminate the wire?
Eyesplice?
Talurit Splice?
Nicopress?
Bulldog clamps and thimbles?
Professionally Swaged Terminals?
Quick-Attach, Norseman, Sta-lok etc?
WireVise ?


I know that an eyesplice is the most solid way to go, and perhaps most aesthetically pleasing (imho) but I want to use 1x19 galvanized wire because it has less constructional stretch. Would this be almost impossible to splice, even at the small diameter of my wire? I have heard it is not difficult to do the splicing, but that the size of thimble needed would be absurdly large. How large?

I have heard that nicopress and Talurit should not be used on standing rigging. The main argument being that they do not do well with 1x19, and that you would need 2 sets of swages to get good strength.

I am leaning towards bulldog clamps. Ugly, cheap, functional, reusable. Easy to service and easy to use. I have not heard an argument against them other than that they are ugly... (that's a weak argument)

Pro swaged terminals. Not too expensive if done in galvanized by an industrial rigger (like the company in Everett, WA that does all the tug-cables). Not serviceable! I want this rig to be easy to work on in case it fails at sea. Jury-riggability is key!

Norseman, sta-lok, suncor quick attach etc. These are all good. But kind of expensive, and would only apply to the headstay.

Has anyone seen a wirevise in use in a marine environment? It seems like a simple and extremely cheap way to terminate galvanized wire, especially 1x19. It simply lets wire go only one way through! These are widely used in agriculture, and reportedly retain 90% of wire strength. I am considering using these, though they seem untested. I do see them terminating guys for telephone poles.

I suppose, in short, I am asking for experience... I hard thing to get through an internet forum. Yet I think that I can learn something!

I have also considered lanyards, as an alternative to turnbuckles, routed direct through the eyes of the stays, and lashed... good idea or bad?

If you were to rig up my boat, in a seamanly way, and a cheap way, how would you do it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Another thing: Poured sockets!

These are no longer done with molten zinc, usually they are bedded with an epoxy polymer! That sounds easy!
 

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Just curious, why are you going with galvanized wire for the backstay?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Galvanized is cheaper, initial cost is lower, and it lasts longer... in my book that makes it superior. Ignore the problem that it requires annual maintenance, and there is no reason to go stainless!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
No. I live aboard in Lake Union. I will be cruising Puget Sound this summer, but I have a one year lease here on the lake.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I went with galvanized, and bought a $45 quart of paint. It is cold-galvanize. It is 97% zinc, with an epoxy base. I have heard good things, and dang it is the heaviest quart of paint ever!
 

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I still dont get it the SS wire is the cheep part of the deal IF your buying SS fittings to use with the galvanized
 

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tager,

I probably shouldn't say it, but I will. In my opinion, you are making a big mistake to even consider galvanized rigging. When you move the boat to a salt environment, it's going to rust. At sometime in the past, maybe it was ok, but time marches on. Stainless steel rigging is used everywhere today (on all the newer boats (last 25-35 years) that I know about), and no where is galvanized used on new boats. (Actually, on some newer race boats, they are moving to high tech fiber vs. stainless, but it costs even more and is not the norm for the overall boating industry). If it was such a good idea, then you would see it on newer boats from the factory. Maybe it saves a little, but hey, you could use carbon steel bolts and screws too..for a time, a really short time. My suggestion, go buy the stainless wire.
 
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