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Splashed
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572 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just saw this about Ganbare: ?Ganbare? ? 1972 Doug Peterson Sloop ? EUR 55000 | David Jones Yacht Brokerage

And Gumboots is sailing in Germany: Boot

Would be interesting to learn more about the new ideas Doug Peterson came up with for these (and other designs). Their track records speak for themselves.

I know (from "Yacht Design According to Perry") that Bob Perry Refers to a Petersonesque keel (or something like that) and Jeff referred to Ganbare in the thread on Dorade.

/Joms
 

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grumpy old man
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5,893 Posts
When Doug came along the world of the IOR, especially, the one ton class was dominated by Dick Carter. I worked for Dick. Prior to me getting to Carter's Doug had worked there for a very short time. His boats were fast vecaues the changed the balance of proportions within the ton rating limits. While Carter's boats were long with a moderate sized rig Doug's GANBARE was over two feet shorter and lighter but had a rig just as big. So, it had a better SA/D. The feeling at Carter's at the time was that his boat was too short and couldn't go in a breeze. It could. But there was nothing special about how he shaped the IOR hull. It was all in the proportions. I will give him credit for eliminating tumblehome. He kept B max all the way to the sheer to give more of an arm for the crew when hiking.
 

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Splashed
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Bob,

Is that really all, IIRC he's been part of several AC design teams, so must have some hardcore knowledge (but that could have been obtained after Ganbare/Gumboots)..

/Joms
 

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grumpy old man
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Jom:
Very good article, good find. I don;t agree with all of it though. The author says that Doug used "flatter garboards". That's not true. Carter was using dead flat garboards well before GANBARE. I still think the succes of GANBARE lay in her improved SA/D die to giving up "L". It was just more horsepower per pound of boat and that proved perfect in the conditions at San Diego.
 

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Once known as Hartley18
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5,179 Posts
FWIW, there's a flush-decked Peterson 43 at my club (aluminium hull) originally built for the Sydney-Hobart that now does ok in the local races. It's the only boat I've sailed on with a hydraulic drive, but it's owned by the Club Measurer and still doesn't win anything on handicap or over the line, so I guess that says something. I know of a few other Peterson designs around, but have not sailed on any of the others.

Peterson's designs are easy to spot because they all look like your typical IOR boat.. certainly nothing special to my eye, merely an old race-horse whose time has come and gone.
 

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Senior Moment Member
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Peterson's designs are easy to spot because they all look like your typical IOR boat.. certainly nothing special to my eye, merely an old race-horse whose time has come and gone.
That's mostly because Peterson pretty well defined the IOR look, along with Holland, Frers, Mull and a couple of others. They didn't have a whole lot of flexibility about the overall look, being so constrained by the measurement points

Go sailing on an old Two Ton warhorse - you will be captivated. They are like sailing the Jolly Green Giants own dinghy. I sailed one not long ago and was astounded by its balance and how light the helm was - virtually the same as my old Kirby Quarter Ton. Sailing a boat as big as that (42', 18,000 Lbs) with a tiller extension while standing at the rail was quite an experience.
 
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