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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 26' that I'm totally refurbing, the interior is torn out. I was thinking on keeping it barebones: 2 aft quarter bunks, stove, sink, head, chair w/ chart table that doubles for dining, the rest for storage and/or tankage.

To make it just a little bit nicer for me, I was wondering about gel coating the interior of the hull. I've been reading through 'This Old Boat' - and it seems achievable, but I suspect it reads easier than it is.

Thoughts?

Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Some of the thicker marine interior paints will fair the interior surface to a degree.
I haven't tried them all so I know not which is best for that.
Obviously I need to learn more about what I'm asking.

It sounds like I simply want to fair with thickened epoxy first, then paint - gelcoat is unnecessary.

Sorry to waste anyone's time, but I do learn a lot from you guys.

Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
if you want to fair the interior glass, you are going to have to get really friendly with an orbital sander, tyvec suit and respirator...;);)
I'm real friendly with 2 of the 3 already; throw-in a Tyvec suit and I'm already there from past days spent floor finishing.

...I'm starting to feel a bit better about this.

:)
 

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you would be surprised how little you notice the uneven surface of the fiberglass when it has a fresh white coat of paint on it.

it just occurs to me that, being in alaska, you might have to be careful about getting good adhesion when painting the interior below the waterline because of the cold water temps and increased condensation... i really don't know but maybe someone here can comment?
 

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you would be surprised how little you notice the uneven surface of the fiberglass when it has a fresh white coat of paint on it.

it just occurs to me that, being in alaska, you might have to be careful about getting good adhesion when painting the interior below the waterline because of the cold water temps and increased condensation... i really don't know but maybe someone here can comment?
I've used white Bilgekote in areas below the waterline. More visible areas I used Interlux Brightsides with excellent results. Last weekend I did the interior of galley cabinets -- really freshens things up. Some people advocate exterior housepaint as adequate -- haven't tried it. Need to be careful with application temperatures -- even with a heater going in the cabin, exterior walls may be much colder than recommended the application temperature.
 

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After years of painting I am going back to gelcoat for bilges and inside hull. Every paint I have used eventually flakes causing issue with bilge pumps. I like a heavy coat of white gel. Use gel with wax added and you will get good results. It covers in one coat and cures fast so you can move on to other projects and most important it will not flake and clog your pumps, also lasts for many years if done right.
 

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sailvayu, I'm also going to be using some gel with wax added for "minor" repairs to the hull and was wondering how thick a coat was possible with just one application? I don't want to sand between coats and if spraying, are you able to make one pass and then allowing just a minute or 2 and then make another pass in order to get a 20 mil thickness?
 

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As it is exothermic cure you can put it on as thick as you like in one pass. Well a least as thick as it stay on without sagging. If the passes are done before cure starts you are ok the wax will rise through without problems. Once the reaction starts you need to stop. You can do a gel test for the timing.
 

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Fairing the interior of a sailboat is going to be a long laborious process that unless youre highly skilled or experienced with gel and trowels and precise non-sagging 'thixotropic mixtures' of gel may result in .... a mess.

The 'traditional' means of interior finishing is either by 'ceiling' (strips of finished wood over battens affixed to the interior surfaces) or 'panels and battens' (~2ft. x 2ft. laminate panels laid over wood strips which are 'glued and screwed' to the interior; small wood battens cover/hide the panel joints.).

;-)
 
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