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Going to be doing some sailing on a newer Gemini 105 MC. Have sailed on some small Cats as well as one bigger 38' Cat. Knowing that ChucklesR owned a Gemini, and that others may have experience, just looking for anything to be aware of in sailing characteristics and motoring.

Rig seems very straight forward. Anything to be aware of about the dagger boards.

How does she handle when motoring (read docking) with as much windage as she shows?

Same information would be helpful for a Gemini Legacy 35. Similar rig, but dual props should make her a lot easier to handle in tight places under motor.

Thanks for any advise.
 

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I honestly never had a problem docking mine, she drives like a car almost. Her turning point was pretty much amid ship, and visibility is fair. The motor turns with the rudder and the W30b puts out plenty of thrust with that big prop. Not a lot of prop wash to contend with either.
Backing was rather non-dramatic just point the motor where your want to go, and move at at least 2kts.
Don't expect it to point as high as a monohull, and pay attention while motoring and turning. It won't turn any faster under sails than it does motoring. For me the tack timing turned out to be optimum if I let the jib go across center, counted to three, slow, righted the wheel to center then reached over to pull in the jib. In light air don't bother, just gybe it around instead of tacking.
If (when) you get caught in irons (a failed tack) either kick on the motor or learn to sail it backwards fast enough to get the boat to turn again.

The 105s drive leg makes it turn somewhat better than a non-turning motor, I assume the Legacy's twin motors will make it better, but also much heavier; overall as well as in the stern. I've chartered bigger cats with dual motors, they do indeed rotate in circles in not much more than a boat length, and can be made to do so in less.

105 has centerboards not dagger boards, there is a difference. The CB's will pop up if you hit something, the DBs will just rip a hole in your hull. The lesson there is to not be afraid of thin water.

As to the rig, pay attention to the reef points. Furl 1/3 of jib at 18, drop some main at 20 etc., that's apparent not true wind speed.
 
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