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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

I've owned my West Wight Potter 15 "Goldie" for 6 months and am having a BLAST learning how to sail on her. Each time out, I learn something new or improve on something I've previously learned. I always come back with more questions than when I launched, and hit the internet hard looking for ideas and opinions. But I do have a question that I havn't seen anything on which I hope doesn't sound too stupid:

I've got a standard working Jib and also a 150% Genoa. While tacking, the standard Jib sheets are easily controlled, being routed inside the shrouds with no resistance while being pulled through the fairleads. However, with the large Genoa on, the Jib Sheets are led outside the shrouds to the Genoa track blocks on the outside of the cockpit, and the lines seem to hang up and rub heavily on the shrouds and shroud attachment gear until I get the boat turned and get the Genoa full of air and away from the boat.

So, what am I doing wrong? Or is this just "the way it is"? I've got copies of the original P-15 manual and have it rigged exactly as from the factory. I've looked at other boats and don't think I'm missing anything? Am I just trying to pull the sail through too soon in the turn? I've considered installing "Jib Rollers" low on the shrouds to help keep the Genoa more off the shouds, or is there another technique that I don't know?

Sorry if this is a lame question, but am looking to learn from your experiences.

Thank you!
Don
 

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However, with the large Genoa on, the Jib Sheets are led outside the shrouds to the Genoa track blocks on the outside of the cockpit, and the lines seem to hang up and rub heavily on the shrouds and shroud attachment gear until I get the boat turned and get the Genoa full of air and away from the boat.

So, what am I doing wrong? Or is this just "the way it is"?
Wellll... that depends :D

Depending on a number of factors: There is usually a "sweet spot," in coming about, where you can release the one jib sheet and haul in the other, have nothing foul on the way across, and actually get the sheet trimmed to just where you need it, or darn close, without the winch handle. But if you're too early, too late, the air's too light, etc.,: Yeah: It'll hang on things coming across.

Btw: We have long plastic shroud covers on our forward lower shrouds, to reduce chafing on the sail. I just tried to find them, but could not. Odd, I would've thought them common as dirt.

Jim
 

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Adding some "rollers" on the shrouds will help a lot, and holding the sheet a bit longer to "back" the sail before release will speed things up (and help complete the turn) but timing takes practice.

As for the rollers, there are turnbuckle covers available that may help somewhat, but buying a few feet of lightweight plastic pipe and slipping them over your shrouds will be cheaper and more effective. Choose white or black as you prefer, and use a solvent to get the printed specs off the pipe.. it'll look fine. I find black is less visible. This idea also works well on babystays that can often interfere with a smooth tack. ABS or PVC will do the trick, or check out the thinner walled pipe used for built-in vacuum systems.
 

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In all but heavy weather hold your old sheet until the headsail fills as you go through the tack and then release and pull it in smartly on the new tack. That should help your situtation out.

Good Luck
Gary
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Wellll... that depends :D

Depending on a number of factors: There is usually a "sweet spot," in coming about, where you can release the one jib sheet and haul in the other, have nothing foul on the way across, and actually get the sheet trimmed to just where you need it, or darn close, without the winch handle. But if you're too early, too late, the air's too light, etc.,: Yeah: It'll hang on things coming across.

Btw: We have long plastic shroud covers on our forward lower shrouds, to reduce chafing on the sail. I just tried to find them, but could not. Odd, I would've thought them common as dirt.

Jim

Jim, thanks much for the help! It sounds kinda like I thought - a little bit my technique, a little bit equipment, a little bit "that's the way it is". I've looked at the shroud covers (West Marine) and am thinking of going this route along with the addition of a "Forespar SP-3 Jib Roller" on each shroud low just above the turnbuckles. Maybe this and practice of my timing when coming about in different airs will get me to the point where I don't feel like a one-armed paper hanger while tacking with the Genoa!
Take care,
Don
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Adding some "rollers" on the shrouds will help a lot, and holding the sheet a bit longer to "back" the sail before release will speed things up (and help complete the turn) but timing takes practice.

As for the rollers, there are turnbuckle covers available that may help somewhat, but buying a few feet of lightweight plastic pipe and slipping them over your shrouds will be cheaper and more effective. Choose white or black as you prefer, and use a solvent to get the printed specs off the pipe.. it'll look fine. I find black is less visible. This idea also works well on babystays that can often interfere with a smooth tack. ABS or PVC will do the trick, or check out the thinner walled pipe used for built-in vacuum systems.
Thank you! excellent help, and I'll be investigating and trying these suggestions. I've got plenty of PVC pipe around in different sizes, so will experiment with this and see if it might do the trick - real cheap and will keep me out of the local West Marine store where they love me and my credit card.

Take care,
Don
 

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Discussion Starter #7
In all but heavy weather hold your old sheet until the headsail fills as you go through the tack and then release and pull it in smartly on the new tack. That should help your situtation out.

Good Luck
Gary

Gary, thank you for the tip! I will admit that I've only had the opportunity to use the Genoa in fairly light airs. If the winds been up at all, I've used the working Jib as I'm still a bit chicken as a newbie sailing single handed. It's possible that it will only be an issue in these cases and in a better wind it may not be an issue.

I'll try these things at next opportunity.
Take care,
Don
 
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