SailNet Community banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

· Senior Member
Joined
·
19,468 Posts
Reaction score
3,881
... and a longish knot tends to slide around shrouds and stays with less hangups than a short chunky one.....
right Unk?
 

· Senior Member
Joined
·
19,468 Posts
Reaction score
3,881
Just one comment about long knots on Spinnakers.. I assume this is in reference to an A sail. While few symmetrical spins are tied on, if they are then long knots are problematic when acting as a guy vis-a-vis the pole. The tack/clew should be as close to the pole as possible for stability.
 

· Senior Member
Joined
·
19,468 Posts
Reaction score
3,881
We ran a little 24' day racer for years with the RF jib's sheet as a single line, with the midpoint fed through the cringle and the two ends pulled through (whatever that's called!;) ).. worked great. That sort of setup tends to work best where the sheet is rarely removed/never from the sail.

This gets heavily loaded, of course, so the disadv. is its difficulty to remove in a hurry if that becomes necessary.
 

· Senior Member
Joined
·
19,468 Posts
Reaction score
3,881
....
I will have to remember the term "peal" thos! thank you!
Marty
The term "peel" typically refers to hoisting one spinnaker before dousing the first one.. but the concept is, of course, the same. As to foil-set genoas we've always simply referred to sail changes e.g. "gotta change down to the #3", with hanked-on sail changes referred to as "bare headed" - since you cannot avoid a period of time without a headsail up or drawing.

Doing "peel" type genoa changes with a luff foil works really well, but calls for some forethought with regard to keeping the halyards organized so they don't cross during the sail changing procedure, know which "groove" you're in so that you can mostly plan to hoist a new sail in the windward groove while still sailing on the first genny. Then throw in a tack, sheet home the new sail, and now the to-be-dropped headsail is to windward and while dropping falls nicely onto the deck.

Of course all this is discussing a racing foil, not a furling foil since the swivel cannot drop if another sail is in the groove.... Headsail changes on furlers are bare headed ones too.... That said, the higher end furler have removable split drums allowing them to be converted to "racing foils" with the swivel simply left to sit at the bottom of the foil.

The main advantage of hanked on sails is that they are well-held on board by the hanks. Luff tape sails are only held by the three corners once down - takes more manpower to keep large parts of these sails from slipping overboard if mishandled. A section of a genny falling overboard and filling in the water can easily tear a stanchion out (or at least bend it)

Sorry for the lecture.. most of you don't need it, but some may find it new to them and helpful!;)
 

· Senior Member
Joined
·
19,468 Posts
Reaction score
3,881
With ..Faster's lecture.........have we gotten off topic, or have we gotten off topic!.......... at least it is still sailing oriented?!?!?!?!?!:D:D:D
Hey.. the first word in the thread title is genoa......:) :D
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top