SailNet Community banner
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
~~~_/)~~~
Joined
·
57 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
anyone have a Genoa sleeve as opposed to sunbrella on their furling headsail? We just bought a C&C 33 mkII, the genoa is done, so we were shopping at the Toronto Boat Show for new sails. One of the vendors suggested the sleeve option as we'd like to race in the future. Haven't found a whole lot of info, but it makes sense to me not to have the extra material (weight) attached to the edge of the sail. Thoughts?
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
19,484 Posts
We've used on in the past. I think they are fine unless you moor in a typically windy area. They can really get moving in a breeze and the cover can chafe on the exposed stitching of the furled sail.

I've seen versions with elastic 'cinches' every few feet, and that does slow it down but also adds to the chafe in the region of the cinches.

Our last jib had no UV cover and we simply got into the habit of putting it below between sails. Not that much more work than when we had hanks. If we were out cruising we did not take it down every night. But after and between daysails we dropped the sail and put it away.

Our current sail has a lightweight UV-resistant dacron cover that doesn't seem to affect the sail like the heavier Sunbrella.. maybe ask your sailmaker about that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,067 Posts
A possible better solution than a 'sleeve' and to keep the weight aloft to minimum - use lightweight adhesive backed (and sewn down) "insignia cloth" for the suncover instead of Sunbrella. Insignia Cloth will only last a few years (~6-8 yrs.) in UV exposure; but, is only a few ounces per sq. yd.
White insignia cloth is the fastest to be damaged in UV (as is most white sail cloth materials); black is probably the best for UV protection but will soon fade to grey or brown.

There supposedly is a newer, more lighter weight Sunbrella version especially made for suncovers; I have no experience with it.
 

·
Super Moderator
Farr 11.6 (Farr 38)
Joined
·
10,697 Posts
My boat came with a bunch of Kevlar racing jibs and genoas and i have continued to buy Kevlar headsails as I have replaced my inventory. I went with Kevlar since Kevlar makes for lighter weight sails that hold their shape better at both ends of the wind range, have a much wider useful wind range, and which have a longer useful lifespan, at least in terms of performance. I originally used a cover like Knuterikt shows with lace lines, and it worked well in most conditions and was easy set and retrieve. I had a light line on the zipper which I clipped to the deck that allowed me to raise it singlehanded if I accordian folded it on the drop. The zippers did not last very long so I had a flap sown on that protected the zipper from sunlight and that helped tremendously.

I went with stickieback suncovers on my new sails. They work very well for how I used the boat, and don't have the problems of weight, and sail distortion associated with sunbrella screens. I don't see the stickeback suncovers as a good solution for everyone since they don't have the durability of sunbrella and should not be left exposed when not in use as a permanent long term solution.

That is not an issue for me since I take the sails off after the each cruise or weekend of sailing. I do that to choose the right sail for the day, but it greatly expands the life of the sail and suncover. My oldest sail with that cover material is 8 years old and its still in good shape. That said laminated sails tend to develop a wear line along the edge of the cover material and after about 5 years I had a strip of narrow tape, Kevlar one side, stickiback on the other added at that point.

If you are racing and don't strip you sails then the sunbrella sock type jib cover is a better option even if it adds another step to put on and take off.

Jeff.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,036 Posts
I had a light line on the zipper which I clipped to the deck that allowed me to raise it singlehanded if I accordian folded it on the drop.
I can also recommend the line on the zipper.
Some more tips for singelhanded use
I have a small bag with square footprint and thin lines in each corner in the top, before taking the cover off I tie this bag on the pulpit so I can accordion fold the cover into the bag - ready for next use.

My spinnaker halyard is lead to the cockpit - I leave some slack at the clutch before i start puling in the bight at the mast. The halyard is tied of at the mast and coiled there.

This way I can do the whole cover on/off from the fore deck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
778 Posts
I have the ATN sleeve. It's a good alternative if you don't want to add the weight of the Sunbrella sacrificial edge. As has been said, one lighter-weight alternative is to use UV Dacron stickyback instead of Sunbrella for the sacrificial panels.

The ATN sleeve is well thought out, and better yet, is not made of Sunbrella. First, Sunbrella is fairly heavy. The most important reason, though, is that Sunbrella, although the best around for UV resistance, is NOT chafe resistant, and in this application wouldn't last too long. It also occurs to me that given the weight and stiffness of Sunbrella, it likely wouldn't draw up against the sail as nicely as the fabric that ATN is using.

Here's Étienne's website and there are two vids demonstrating the sleeve in action:
ATN Sailing Equipment | Genoa Sleeve
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
I have used jib sleeve on smaller race boats like J-80 and Martin 242. These boats use spin halyard to hoist sleeve so raising sleeve is a two person job since spin halyard is led to cockpit and sleeve is zipped from foredeck. The top of your furler and the exit of the spin halyard exit from the mast would have to arranged such that you can get the sleeve all the way to the top of the furler. The sleeves were sunbrella or similar.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,036 Posts
I have used jib sleeve on smaller race boats like J-80 and Martin 242. These boats use spin halyard to hoist sleeve so raising sleeve is a two person job since spin halyard is led to cockpit and sleeve is zipped from foredeck. The top of your furler and the exit of the spin halyard exit from the mast would have to arranged such that you can get the sleeve all the way to the top of the furler. The sleeves were sunbrella or similar.
Not necessarily a two person job :) http://www.sailnet.com/forums/2510177-post6.html
 

·
ASA and PSIA Instructor
Joined
·
4,333 Posts
we use a sock on some club Harbor 20s, dealing with the sock takes an extra 10 minutes getting underway and closing up, so twenty minutes out of the sail. To each their own, I'm very happy with how my recent 135% sets with its Dacron sunshield.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
62 Posts
I recently acquired a viking 28 which came with about 5 headsails. Rather than having the uv material sewn in it am considering the atn genoa sleeve. This should provide protection for any head sail used. I would appreciate anyones opinion as to whether or not this is a good idea. Thanks
 

·
al brazzi
Joined
·
2,088 Posts
I recently acquired a viking 28 which came with about 5 headsails. Rather than having the uv material sewn in it am considering the atn genoa sleeve. This should provide protection for any head sail used. I would appreciate anyones opinion as to whether or not this is a good idea. Thanks
Im assuming hank on gibs, if that's the case its easy enough to drop each time and choose the right one each time you go out. Now if you use the same one most every time you go out then maybe. Or if its a roller put the UV fabric on the big one in which case the smaller one are harder to use because in a blow the Ginny is hard to drop. Racers will drop and change purposely for versatility.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
19,484 Posts
Im assuming hank on jibs, .....
Don't think so, Al. Doesn't make sense to use a sleeve on anything but a roller furled headsail. To try to drag a sleeve over a loose hanging hanked on sail sounds like a nightmare to me.

Sleeves can certainly work, esp to avoid individual UV strips. However they are hard on the sail, esp the stitching and more especially if moored in a breezy area. The sleeves start to oscillate which makes the (sunbrella) sleeve chafe the outer roll and the proud stitches.

IMO it's not much more work to stow the sail properly than to rig and un-rig a sleeve, - and saves the cost of the sleeve.YMMV...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,402 Posts
In our case the sleeve is the best option. we have a non overlapping jib 108%. so we only have one size jib to hoist on the furler. the sail is composite so we are not going to sew on a sacrificial covered. Taking the sail up and down is harder on the sail then rolling it up on the furler. cover has draw strings so it is very tight to the sail and the rig has very little movement in a blow.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,256 Posts
I got a new ATN sleeve last year, they have an improved lacing system over an older one I was using that allows you to cinch it up pretty darn snug. An elastic strap on the zipper pull makes raising a one person job. They aren't cheap at about ~ $13/ ft.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
19,484 Posts
We paid about $350 to have a new UV strip put on our (slightly larger) headsail last fall.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top