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Hey,

So I owned and sailed and maintained and updated my last boat since 2006. I knew where everything was on board, how the boat would respond under all sorts of conditions, how all the various bits of gear worked (both on deck and in the cabin) and etc.

Now I'm sailing my 'new' boat and I feel like I'm learning everything all over again. I am not sure which line adjusts what sail control, what halyard tension should be for X knots of wind, how to fill the water tanks, where I stowed the binoculars, etc.

I have forgotten how hard it is to learn all these things. But its getting better. The 'things to do' list of getting shorter and I'm getting more comfortable.

The good news is that the boat sails really REALLY nicely. Fast, responsive, nicely balanced helm, and did I mention fast? Once I finish getting the new gear installed (autopilot, Lazy Jacks, inverter, and some shade for the cockpit at anchor) I'll be really happy. Oh year, the nav lights quit working. When I brought the boat home last fall all of the lights worked. We were out watching fireworks over the weekend I found out that red and green lights didn't work but all the rest did. Then, on the mooring, I checking some switches and the stern light stopped. Hopefully it's just bulbs but I'm never that lucky.

oh well.

Barry
 

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Now I'm sailing my 'new' boat and I feel like I'm learning everything all over again.
I hear you. When we bought our current boat, everything seemed overwhelming for a couple of days. But then I started on the mile-long checklist and the familiarity grew.

When I brought the boat home last fall all of the lights worked.
LOL. This happens to us every year. The steaming light and foredeck light are in the same housing and sometimes they both work, sometimes just the steaming light works. Now the foredeck light works and the steaming light is out. It's a conspiracy to get me up the mast to clean the underside of our moldy spreaders. :)

Congratulations!! ......isn't unfamiliarity with a new boat a nice problem to have?
 

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One of None
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Hey,

So I owned and sailed and maintained and updated my last boat since 2006. I knew where everything was on board, how the boat would respond under all sorts of conditions, how all the various bits of gear worked (both on deck and in the cabin) and etc.

Now I'm sailing my 'new' boat and I feel like I'm learning everything all over again. I am not sure which line adjusts what sail control, what halyard tension should be for X knots of wind, how to fill the water tanks, where I stowed the binoculars, etc.

I have forgotten how hard it is to learn all these things. But its getting better. The 'things to do' list of getting shorter and I'm getting more comfortable.

The good news is that the boat sails really REALLY nicely. Fast, responsive, nicely balanced helm, and did I mention fast? Once I finish getting the new gear installed (autopilot, Lazy Jacks, inverter, and some shade for the cockpit at anchor) I'll be really happy. Oh year, the nav lights quit working. When I brought the boat home last fall all of the lights worked. We were out watching fireworks over the weekend I found out that red and green lights didn't work but all the rest did. Then, on the mooring, I checking some switches and the stern light stopped. Hopefully it's just bulbs but I'm never that lucky.

oh well.

Barry
Barry Nope.. you don't have a new boat because LOL

:worthless:

Lets have a look see soon! congrats!
 

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When we bought our boat we negotiated a walk through with the prior owner who had owned the boat for the last 30 years. The broker mentioned it as a possibility so we included it as a term in our offer. It was really helpful. The owner spent about 3 hours with me on the day of closing, rigged the sails, reefing lines, lazy jacks, and the furler, hooked up the batteries, fired the engine up, went through the systems. Probably not an option in many sales, but I am sure glad it was for us. We sailed away that afternoon and I'm not sure if I would have felt confident to do so otherwise. It would have taken me a lot of time to figure out everything that was shown to me.
 

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The more time you spend with your boat, the more you learn, the closer you become. After 11 months of ownership, (and having done ALOT of refitting) I KNOW my boat. Even if you are not mechanically inclined, you learn where everything is and how it works. I think it's really all part of the fun of ownership. Have fun!
 

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I completely understand ... we are going through the same thing ... for me, the biggest change was going from a 36 Center Cockpit to a 44 aft cockpit. The first few times docking were a bit of an experience. It was only after I realized that the helm on the newer 44 was about 15 feet behind the keel where as I was only 4 feet behind the keel on the Center Cockpit that docking became much easier. Prior to that, I started to turn too late ... as if I was still on a center cockpit. Yikes!
 

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Hey,

So I owned and sailed and maintained and updated my last boat since 2006. I knew where everything was on board, how the boat would respond under all sorts of conditions, how all the various bits of gear worked (both on deck and in the cabin) and etc.

Now I'm sailing my 'new' boat and I feel like I'm learning everything all over again. I am not sure which line adjusts what sail control, what halyard tension should be for X knots of wind, how to fill the water tanks, where I stowed the binoculars, etc.

I have forgotten how hard it is to learn all these things. But its getting better. The 'things to do' list of getting shorter and I'm getting more comfortable.

The good news is that the boat sails really REALLY nicely. Fast, responsive, nicely balanced helm, and did I mention fast? Once I finish getting the new gear installed (autopilot, Lazy Jacks, inverter, and some shade for the cockpit at anchor) I'll be really happy. Oh year, the nav lights quit working. When I brought the boat home last fall all of the lights worked. We were out watching fireworks over the weekend I found out that red and green lights didn't work but all the rest did. Then, on the mooring, I checking some switches and the stern light stopped. Hopefully it's just bulbs but I'm never that lucky.

oh well.

Barry

Love those slow C&Cs:):):laugher

Barry well be back in the Sound after August 15. Let's try and meet up. Would love to see the new boat
 
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From the description of the lighting failure I will bet on the switches, or the ground connections to them.
 

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Congratulations Barry. Those are good problems to have.

(Would love to see some pictures.)

Regards,
Brad
 

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Even with a boat I've had for 6 years, at the beginning of the season I hit my head on the dodger, scrape my shins on the companionway steps, trip on blocks going when walking forward on deck....takes a couple of weeks to move "gracefully" about the boat, and I use the term loosely.

And, yea, Barry, where's the pictures man!
 

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I'm "in the same boat." So many new wires to trace, goodies to discover ("Wow I didn't know the boat came with one of these!") and so many headaches to discover as well.

MedSailor
 

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For the first year of owning this boat, I had unlimited towing insurance, and a very comprehensive, low deductible insurance policy. As I became more familiar with the boat, I was very comfortable raising the deductible a lot, and giving up the towing insurance, which isn't available down here, anyway.
Though I found a lot of items not on the listing (like networked weather and depth finder for the Garmin chartplotter, a MaxProp and a hailer that automatically does the bell & whistle signals in limited visibility), there were very few things that were different from most other boats I'd operated over the years. It seems most boats of a similar vintage from the same country, have much the same gear installed by the manufacturer, such as electrical panels, gauges, engines, pumps and lighting. Things only get weird if an owner upgrades systems himself without keeping the manuals and installation instructions.
 

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We did it the quick way.

We bought the boat on 29th May and set sail across the Pacific to New Zealand on 10th June.

By the time we got to New Zealand in early August, we knew an awful lot about the boat. ;)
 
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Discussion Starter #17
Hey,

So I've been spending a lot of time on Deep Blue C and feeling better about the boat.

If you want to see some pictures I have created an album:
SailNet Community - BarryL's Album: Deep Blue C

My family and I did a simple and fun race last weekend and unbelievable to us, we won! It was a very casual race, no spinnakers, two upwind legs and two reaching legs, but the boat just flies!

My son and I tried to do a double handed race two days later, but 20+ kt gusts were too much for us so we withdrew. With just a reefed main we were able to pinch our way upwind without heeling too much. Then we'd get hit with a 30 degree wind shift and the boat would heel 30-40 degrees. My son (he's 13) would scream (I would too, but just inside my head) I would head up until the sail luffed, and we carried on.

I have made some nice and simple modifications: Lazy jacks (used them for the first time today, much easier to lower and flake the mainsail), cockpit adjustable topping lift (the boat came with just a rod kicker, but when the mainsail is down the boom drops really low into the cockpit and my wife was afraid someone was going to get creamed by the boom. Now I drop the main into the lazy jacks, throw a sail tie on, then raise the boom with the topping lift, tension the main sheet and everyone is safe and happy), and backstay adjuster. Tomorrow the autopilot gets installed, then I can resume single handed sailing.

Today we sailed / motored (no wind) to the next harbor (Port Jefferson if you know the area) anchored, and then swam, kayaked, ate and lazed about. Around 2:00PM a nice breeze came up so we had a very nice sail home. I can't believe how fast this boat is. With a 10 kt breeze on the beam we were cracking 8 kts (with a bit of a fair current). No muss, fingertip control on the wheel, and little heeling.

The boat has no dodger or bimini, so I need to rig some shade in the cockpit for when we're at anchor. My wife had bought a large sun shade type thing that was designed for home use - you tie it to three trees or something like that, but it didn't work well on the boat.

Anyway, the more time I spend on the boat the more I get used to used to it. The new owners of Day To Remember sailed her away yesterday, so she's gone to a good home and I will get used to Deep Blue C.

Barry

PS - Andre - you're crazy. I thought I was brave sailing a new to me boat home 50 miles!
 
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