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Saxomaphone Rules!
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Discussion Starter #1
And that I have gotten addicted to having water under my keel and a moving deck under my feet, I is a lookin' to buy a boat, go sailing, and not come back.

After working for Uncle Sam, I went back to being a sax/ woodwind dude. Left the road to work on Cruise ships. Fell in love with being on the waves.

I've seen flat glass pulling into Grenada. 40' seas with 80kt winds in the Gulf. The North sea in winter, and the Richard Simmons cruise to lose...

Yep There is gonna be a learning curve. And as with most curves, it's gonna hit me from the flanks. And when I least want It to.

Any way, What would be the downside of ( seamanship-wise ) of starting off with a Pearson Triton? Or something spankin' close?

And what would you folks call close?
 

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Good luck on the dream.

"ANY" boat the length of the triton that can actually sail, We're not talking "old shoes" ie Westsail 32 or equal, can and will teach you to sail, along with taking class's from a local source. Then it is a matter of getting on the water as skip in any way shape or form you can.

Some will say that learning on a dinghy, ala "Laser" or equal is a better way to go, along with a tiller steered boat. which can be found on boats upwards of 30'ish'. Not sure, as I have yet to skip a boat with a wheel.........ooops, forgot about the race on some overloaded Hunter 45 or there about last spring. Other than that, nothing more than a couple of hours. That owner seemed to enjoy wandering about on his boat that day instead of skipping!

Marty
 

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I don't know about learning on Laser or similar boats, the smallest sail boat I've ever been on is the 30 footer I now own.
 

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Dennis,

You have the same issue as my wife, been on any power boats, but not on a sailboat until we bought our Jeanneau Arcadia ~ 30' long.

Marty
 

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I learned on a pico and then a hobie cat which is a great way to learn sail trim and other basics. Those boats have near instant response and if you mess up you go for a swim - no permanent damage is likely. And if you dont mess up you can go amazingly fast. On the other hand, there is no reason you cant learn on a bigger boat. I actually found them more forgiving when I moved up to them but once they get away from you it is likely to end up causing more trouble than a quick swim.

But I would say to go sail on whatever there is. A few lessons were very good for me when I moved to bigger boats - there are a lot of systems to deal with that arent necessarily best learned by messing up like 12 volt elec and diesel engines ... But an instructor hired for a few hours on whatever boat you have can make a big difference.
 

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Dennis,

You have the same issue as my wife, been on any power boats, but not on a sailboat until we bought our Jeanneau Arcadia ~ 30' long.

Marty
Blt,

Only been on a few power boats but many sail boats. Before I bought my boat I spent some time on a schooner.
 

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Triton? yes!

I'm the current owner of Triton hull #630 and a Triton is a great boat to learn to sail on. Here's my thoughts about owning one.

Cons: A little small for a 28' boat, long overhangs and short waterline and fairly narrow. If you're tall you'll find the cabin from the head forward a little tight. The youngest Triton is 40 years old so you're going to be dealing with old systems and things like soft decks, potentially older fittings, electrical, etc. Old hoses and seacocks and maybe some dangerous old gate valves. Old engines (but still potentially very good). She's got a slow keel and is initially tender (heels easily). Weather helm can be an issue but I think its more a function of not knowing how to balance one's sails or trying to overpower the boat.

Pros: Just a beautiful beautiful boat. Built like a rock.. a really really solid rock. Perfectly sized for one, maybe two people, to spend a lot of time on. Simple simple simple and easy to work on. Sea-kindly with that long, deep heavy keel (which if you get capsized you don't have to worry about it not righting itself). A great support community with lots of information on the net. Fairly inexpensive to buy into.. but if you want something that isn't going to require a deck recore you have to look around or pay a little more.

Bristol 27 is just about the same boat
Tartan 27 is a nice boat with a long but shallow keel and a centerboard
The early pearson 30' is about the same boat as the Triton (not the 1970's fin keel boat.. which is also reportedly a very nice boat, but really a more modern design)
The pearson Vanguard 32' is a bit larger and more comfortable and reportedly a very nice boat. I think its a Rhodes design. I've been on a couple but they're quite a bit more to buy into than a Triton.
I think there are a couple more designs out there that are basically Triton copies from the 60's.
The Triton yahoo group mailing list is quite active and very inexpensive boats are posted there regularly.

Keep in mind that Tritons were built on both east and west coasts. The west coast boats are heavier, have less brightwork topsides and are generally in higher demand and harder to find.

Hope this helps
 

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Saxomaphone Rules!
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Discussion Starter #12
Mornin' folks,

Thanks for welcome and information. Very much appreciated. Can't wait to start the next adventure, but with all considered it will most likely be spring before it gets started. I figure if I take my time and make the fewest mistakes right off the bat I won't have so many headaches later on. Gonna be enough of those anyway. But that's how we learn isn't it?
 
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