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Bristol 45.5 - AiniA
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Japan is in an awkward spot for almost any circumnavigation route. It would be a massive detour from a coconut milk run and all those hunks of land get in way of an eastward route in the northern hemisphere. As I remember, there is also a typhoon risk during any season and not many places to bail out. It makes more sense for a northern Pacific circuit, but this a route that attracts very few people. Check your Cornell for details.
 
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KS is right, Japan is WAY off any typical circumnavigation route... Search instead for people who have done a Pacific circuit, returning to N America via the northern route, Aleutians, etc... The pickings will be slim, indeed, that's a pretty challenging route...

The Pardeys, and Hal and Margaret Roth are among the few who have done that voyage, though their experiences in Japan are by now seriously outdated... Everything I've heard, although Japan is a very welcoming country to sailors, there is very little infrastructure away from major population centers in support of cruising yachtsmen, and apparently the governmental bureaucracy is nothing short of a nightmare to deal with...

Alvah and Diana Simon visited Japan a few years ago, wrote about it in CRUISING WORLD... Probably the most comprehensive contemporary account is to be found in the experience of Tere and Michael Batham:

Cruising Japan to New Zealand: The Voyage of the Sea Quest: Tere Batham: 9781574091823: Amazon.com: [email protected]@[email protected]@http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/[email protected]@[email protected]@51O4eqH1iRL
 

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Closet Powerboater
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Schooner Captain
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I pulled my cornell off the shelf and It looks like I could do a California, Hawaii, South Pacific, Japan, Hong Kong, Indonesia route. There is a solid roue from Japan to Hong Kong.
I guess it may come down to desire, and the cyclone issue, and the issue with monsters coming from the sea :) A small part of me is screaming to skip Hawaii. So expensive. However, the amateur volcanologist side of me is making me go.
 

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The Cornell book is a must have, if not for the fact that it's the gold standard, then to use it to know where the sheep migration patterns are. Some will want to migrate with them, some will want to go their own way and don't want to be disturbed by the mass migrations.

There is a better book for route planning in my opinion.
Ocean Passages and Landfalls.
by Rod Heikell and Andy O'Grady.

It's got better visual representations of the routes and ports (it has more pretty pictures) and it has enough customs and port/anchorage info to help you decide if you want to go somewhere or if it's going to be to big of a PITA. It's not quite detailed enough to call it a true cruising guide to every port they list, but they do have harbor charts and significantly more info than Cornell, and the format is much more approachable and readable. The guys who write it appear to be the real deal. They've got photos of their 2 boat everywhere from Antarctica, to Scandinavia to Newfoundland, to the tropics.

Here's a picture of one of the pages that outlines some of the routes you're considering. It is reproduced without permission, but in the hopes that you'll be impressed and go buy a copy of their book. :)



MedSailor
 

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Bristol 45.5 - AiniA
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The routes you are talking about are different from what UP is discussing. He wants to add the South Pacific to where he wants to go. Crossing the ITCZ does add considerable complexity. Maybe by the time he gets there China will have gotten its act together and understand recreational boats. It would be a nice coastal cruise with interesting places to stop like Shanghai and many smaller ports. There is pressure from a tiny cruising community there to do something. Vietnam is also a problem. Last time I checked (we were thinking of going this route) there was only one small (~80 mile) chunk of coast open to cruisers - where there is a charter fleet of some sort. That means you cannot go to a lot of the more interesting cities.

We were thinking South Pacific, Australia, Indonesia, Philippines and north from there. the timings were really difficult.
 

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The routes you are talking about are different from what UP is discussing. He wants to add the South Pacific to where he wants to go. Crossing the ITCZ does add considerable complexity. Maybe by the time he gets there China will have gotten its act together and understand recreational boats. It would be a nice coastal cruise with interesting places to stop like Shanghai and many smaller ports. There is pressure from a tiny cruising community there to do something. Vietnam is also a problem. Last time I checked (we were thinking of going this route) there was only one small (~80 mile) chunk of coast open to cruisers - where there is a charter fleet of some sort. That means you cannot go to a lot of the more interesting cities.

We were thinking South Pacific, Australia, Indonesia, Philippines and north from there. the timings were really difficult.
Yup, the timings of those routes appear to be incredibly complex, seems doubtful you could make it up to Japan and back in a single season, and have enough time to really explore... I haven't looked at it closely, however...

Really a shame Vietnam is so difficult and limited, it's a magical country... One of the few guys I'm aware of who made it there on a cruising boat was Jack van Ommen, and he did it quite awhile ago, seems to have become more restricted since then. Parts of the coast are magnificent, and a trip up the Mekong in a cruising boat would be one for the ages... Shoal draft would be essential, however, and it would really test your skills of seat of the pants piloting... :)

If you needed to stock up on teak, that would be the spot...





But, the timing of going up to Japan, and then back down to Indonesia, might be the least of the challenges of such a trip... After all, the S China Sea is one of the most heavily trafficked bodies of water on earth, the extent of merchant shipping along that route would be immense, and never-ending... Coupled with the amount of unlit fishing vessels closer to the coasts, seems to me that would make for an incredibly stressful passage(s)...

And, then there's the little matter of piracy in that part of the world...





Oh, nevermind...
 

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The Cornell book is a must have, if not for the fact that it's the gold standard, then to use it to know where the sheep migration patterns are. Some will want to migrate with them, some will want to go their own way and don't want to be disturbed by the mass migrations.

There is a better book for route planning in my opinion.
Ocean Passages and Landfalls.
by Rod Heikell and Andy O'Grady.
That book is pretty good, but for the sort of 'musing' and long-term thinking UP is doing, I think Jimmy Cornell's WORLD VOYAGE PLANNER is even better, still...

NEW: World Voyage Planner, Jimmy Cornell?s Latest Book | Cornell Sailing Publications and Events
 

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Schooner Captain
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
That book is pretty good, but for the sort of 'musing' and long-term thinking UP is doing, I think Jimmy Cornell's WORLD VOYAGE PLANNER is even better, still...

NEW: World Voyage Planner, Jimmy Cornell?s Latest Book | Cornell Sailing Publications and Events
I figure if the cruise will take 3-5-7 years to make, I better read all I can by people who have done it. I have read a few who have done chille and the horn.
Not going to bother with the Atlantic crossing, Thats one of the easiest crossing in the proper season.
 

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Bristol 45.5 - AiniA
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Just because an Atlantic crossing is the easiest does not mean it is easy. Also what part of the Atlantic matters. We did have a concern about pirates/insurgents/terrorists in southern Philippines but people are doing it. I think also that Indonesia is much safer than before. The map of pirates in the Indian Ocean must be pretty old. The area of exclusion suggested for yachts by ISF and the naval forces in area is much, much larger to 10°S and 78°E (at least last year)
 

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Couple of points ...

Funnelweb | High Performance Sailing?. where fast just ain't fast enough!

There might be a bit of good info in there. These guys did the Melbourne to Osaka race a year or so back then sailed on to the US before heading back to Oz.


Secondly ... there are now two mentions of guns in this thread ... or at least there were until I removed them. Guns mean Off topic and that is where this thread will be headed if the subject is broached again. Of course you (insert name of potential miscreant) could take a risk and keep talking bang bangs but then of course you might be yearning for a holiday.

Have a great day.

Edit ..... Sorry ... that might have been a bit harsh but please do not talk guns of any description in an On Topic thread.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Couple of points ...

Funnelweb | High Performance Sailing?. where fast just ain't fast enough!

There might be a bit of good info in there. These guys did the Melbourne to Osaka race a year or so back then sailed on to the US before heading back to Oz.
I will take a look.
Secondly ... there are now two mentions of guns in this thread ... or at least there were until I removed them. Guns mean Off topic and that is where this thread will be headed if the subject is broached again. Of course you (insert name of potential miscreant) could take a risk and keep talking bang bangs but then of course you might be yearning for a holiday.

Have a great day.

Sorry ... that might have been a bit harsh but please do not talk guns of any description in an On Topic thread.
What makes guns off topic? they are as sailing related as a whisker pole. Not everyone has them either.
 

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What makes guns off topic? they are as sailing related as a whisker pole. Not everyone has them either.
Don't even go there. They are in fact as sailing related as a T Model Ford and mention of them will simply not be tolerated in an On Topic forum.

End of story. This is not open to debate. Let it go.
 

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I figure if the cruise will take 3-5-7 years to make, I better read all I can by people who have done it. I have read a few who have done chille and the horn.
Not going to bother with the Atlantic crossing, Thats one of the easiest crossing in the proper season.
So, how does one sail around the world without crossing either the North or South Atlantic ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·

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What I was saying is that I don't need to spend time researching it beyond knowing this: Top 10 tips for an Atlantic crossing | Yachting World. Its just something I am going to do. No extra diesel, No extra water beyond 200 bottles of spring water. Easy, compared to say going to 40S
Over the past several weeks, we have seen a number of crews/boats that didn't find the Atlantic to be particularly "easy"... I suppose none of them read that article... :)

So, what are your plans after leaving FL? Is your first voyage gonna be the one that takes you down to Antarctica/Cape Horn? Ever consider doing something like a shakedown out to Bermuda and back first? We East Coast wannabes are extremely lucky to have that option at our fingertips, that trip is probably as ideal a bluewater shakedown cruise as exists anywhere in the world - although some have been known to modify their perception of how "easy" a passage in the North Atlantic may, or may not be, after making that trip... :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
The plan is to sail to the UK with a stop in NY on the way. This will be the shake down, PT2. We already went from NY-FL with not a single issue the entire trip. I have made some major upgrades, and am making more. We need to try them. So a UK trip is the first stop now. I would like to visit Africa too. Maybe some med cruising. Will see how we are loving it when we hit the UK.
However no, This is not a challenge for our boat. Maybe for us....
 

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Take a look at Wendy Hinman's excellent travelogue Tightwads on the Loose (available from Amazon, of course). They started out all coconut milky, but turned north to the Philippines, China, and Japan, returning home across the northern pacific 7 years later. Small boat, too. Probably a bit out of date now, but it's one of the better voyage tales.
 
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