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I think a stitch and glue marine plywood design in that size range would be lighter than a foam cored GRP dinghy. Check out the CLC line of designs.
 

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I thought a foam core would be lighter than ply, but thanks for the suggestion.
In larger sizes, yes, but the smallest boats are often lighter in stitch-and-glue than in GRP. A stitch-and-glue boat doesn't even need to have a full coat of fiberglass on it, where the skins on the foam-cored GRP boat have to have a minimum thickness to guarantee the core's integrity and provide sufficient stiffness to the design. Marine plywood, even 1/8" is pretty stiff torsionally, unlike foam, once it is bent and held in that position.

For instance, the Chesapeake Light Craft's Eastport Pram is 7' 9" x 48" and only weighs 62 lbs. One 8' GRP/Foam dinghy that I found on the net weighed in at 130 lbs... People often underestimate how much epoxy or vinylester resin and fiberglass cloth actually weigh.
 

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I'm planning the same thing but I want to stick to all composite so my plan is a fiberglass and carbon fiber dink with vinyalester resin. I'm shooting to keep the weight under 40 lbs. I happen to have a 7 foot pram mold but if I didn't I would build a quick and dirty pram mold using masonite with a little stitch and glue technique. There are plans out there if your not up to designing one yourself. I still plan to use my inflatable but this one will be designed with a removable seat so it can act as a cover for the rolled up inflatable. I never tow the dink so this one is just in case I need to kedge out an anchor or make a quick trip to shore and not bother blowing up the inflatable.
The problem is that you've got demands for a light boat, but it has to be big enough to carry a load, durable enough to survive contact with docks, the beach, boats, etc. Build the boat too lightly and it won't survive the use it is intended for.

A glue-and-stitch plywood boat with kevlar reinforcement for the exterior to provide some abrasion/puncture resistance is a good compromise for a home-built tender. I don't think you can make one with carbon fiber and fiberglass that will weigh under 40 lbs. and be strong enough to be usable.
 
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