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Discussion Starter #1
Hi All,

I'm still glowing from the most outstanding day we had Saturday. Had just the right amount of breeze (4-6k) for a newb to not get himself in too much trouble hoisting a spinnaker. :) It's a big (I'm guessing full size for a 30') tri-radial symetrical chute with an ATN sock. The sock worked pretty slick, (OK you end up with this bunch of sock at the top)... but it sure is easy to hoist and take down. The wife stayed at the helm, I did all the work on deck... we loved it! Even in a boo-boo situation... the port sheet let go from the boat (my bad :eek:) as we were just about to drop it, the sail flew all over to the stbd side of the boat - looked like one of those spinnaker blow out videos, so I just dropped the sock and pulled it all in as wife eased the hallyard.

Like many, I was really aprehensive about even trying the chute. It now stays on board and we will use it. :)

P.S. The black bird is the Allmand Logo
 

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Looks great!

Try to get it rotated out in front more especially if you are sailing deep. When you have your main up, you don't want to blanket it.

ETA: btw, those sail ties on your main are like lethal weapons. I can't tell you how many times I got knocked in the forehead with those things when you try to take them off.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Looks great!

ETA: btw, those sail ties on your main are like lethal weapons. I can't tell you how many times I got knocked in the forehead with those things when you try to take them off.
I know... I've come close. Reminds me of those "clacker balls on a string" back in the 70's or 80's. Those things could kill you. They'd never be allowed to sell those today!
 

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Nice!

A very rough rule of thumb is to have the pole at right angles to the wind. So against the headstay (almost, don't strain the headstay) when beam reaching, and straight out to the side on a dead run.

and as you've discovered, spinnys don't luff, they curl in on the windward edge. So you trim in quickly (or bear off) just enough to put that curl back to sleep.

Actually spinnys do luff, but we call that a "collapse" ;-)


Soon you'll be saying "blow the guy" without thinking it strange....
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Nice!

Soon you'll be saying "blow the guy" without thinking it strange....
I watched a youTube video of the ATN sock... and that's exactly how they say to do it. So... by mistake, I snuffed the chute properly. :rolleyes: Because we didn't know the guy had just come undone, it freaked us out having the chute all flying on the stbd side. But I was already on deck and just dropped the sock... no big. So, that will be what I say to the wife. :)
 

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Also....remember to keep a grip on the control line while you are hoisting or lowering the "sausage". Don't ask me how I know this is very important. ; )
 

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Fun isn't it? I had a similar experience last week, except just me on the boat. You'll probably want to use it in tandem with the main normally though.
 

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awesome! just an observation though your furler looks loose or not furled in tight with a wrap or 2 of the sheets, 3rd pic right above the pole

or maybe its a loose uv cover?

just something to avoid getting snagged on...the smoother the better

congrats!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
awesome! just an observation though your furler looks loose or not furled in tight with a wrap or 2 of the sheets, 3rd pic right above the pole

or maybe its a loose uv cover?

just something to avoid getting snagged on...the smoother the better

congrats!
Thanks Christian. You're correct... sloppy job on my part with the furler. :eek:
 

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Congrats Dave! I love using the spinnaker, it's a very useful sail in the light air that we have around here. I just sailed from Port Townsend to Shilshole today with the spinnaker up about 80% of the way. The wind was light (7-10 knots) but we were able to maintain 3.5-4.5 knots (a little faster SOG with current) which allowed us to sail while people all around us were motoring.

On this trip I really came to appreciate my asymmetric spinnaker, a sail that I normally don't like so much. I had my dinghy on the foredeck for much of the trip, which makes working with the spinnaker pole a lot harder. The asym works without it, and a little trimming experience on a J/109 has helped me learn how to jybe the asym smoothly and to fly it more efficiently. I think I'll keep my asym loaded in the sock and use it for cruising, and my symmetrical spinnaker and pole without a sock and ready for racing and more heavily crewed day sails.

Here is my favorite spinnaker photo from my trip:


A small piece of advice: be careful with the guy tension and your pole's position. You don't want it up against your furler and forestay, a strong gust could pull it over and damage the track. Just a couple of inches gives you breathing room to handle stretch in the guy.
 
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