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Yes, that is the GPS unit I have. All of the electronics are located in the antenna housing. You have two mounting screws and a small hole for the data cable. The power to the unit comes through two of those wires and is supplied by the E-system. Very convenient. Shop around on the internet. You can get it for less. I bought mine through someplace called “Marine Electronics…” Again, I need to look at my notes. In the end, the new GPS is a “slave” to the E-system, but there are worse things in the world. I recommend that you run the “high speed” bus to your Nav station so you can use your laptop and a charting program to develop routes and waypoints. Keying them directly into the E-System is a real PITA.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Gee George...what the hell is a "high speed bus"???? was it that bus in the movie SPEED???? With the annoying irritating Sandra Ballsock??

Why did you have to make it more complicated...wait..speed???will that increase boat's speed???

I am only going to Madeira, a 700NM trip in 2 or 3 days...a sextant works good too...besides when I went there first GPS's were'nt available and we found it..

But I will look into that...
 

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The Raymarine unit isn't just an antenna, but a full-blown GPS that outputs Seatalk-so it does make sense to install it and give you redundancy on the GPS units. This was probably Cam's plan all along, given how he believes no one should leave port without at least five of the things aboard the boat.
 

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Gee George...what the hell is a "high speed bus"???? was it that bus in the movie SPEED???? With the annoying irritating Sandra Ballsock??

Why did you have to make it more complicated...wait..speed???will that increase boat's speed???

I am only going to Madeira, a 700NM trip in 2 or 3 days...a sextant works good too...besides when I went there first GPS's were'nt available and we found it..

But I will look into that...
That's it, I'm bringing my sextant...you can't carry enough fuel and food to make Florida...:D
 

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You are not doing your installation right if you don’t reflect on how simple it was to use the sextant and sight reduction tables at least once. Speaking of high speed buses – What is wrong with Sandra Bullock anyway? She can drive my bus anytime. In the network, the HSB is really the standard network bus we use with our computers. It’s just a lot faster compared to the serial port/RS232/NMEA baud rate. This enables you to utilize your laptop as a true repeater for your system. So while you’re lying seasick in your bunk, you can monitor the progress of your ‘best helmsman” as you speed towards Madeira. While you’re doing your install – have you considered adding the video camera function too? That way you will never have to leave your cabin until you hit the Canaries! Let me know if you want any more suggestions on how to spend your money.
 

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The Raymarine RS 125, their current model, is a complete receiver outputting either NMEA 0183 or SeaTalk, RM's earlier network protocol. Which mode it comes up in depends on how the power is applied to it. It is not NMEA 2000 compatible. This is a versatile, delicious GPS receiver. It interfaces very neatly via 0183 with the SR series AIS receivers to any chart plotter with 0183 input.
The Garmin HVS 17(x) is as nice a receiver and is NMEA 2000 compatible if you want to order it that way. NMEA 0183 is an option for it too and works the same way with a SR receiver. The SR accomplishes the data merge (38.4KB, AIS rate) from either source flawlessly. I use the SR101 receiver with my Garmin 12 MAP; my Garmin Geko 201; and my Magellan GPS Map Color; inputting to my HP DV1000 laptop running Fugawi ENC.
Cheap, and works very well indeed
Howard Keiper
 

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You are not doing your installation right if you don't reflect on how simple it was to use the sextant and sight reduction tables at least once. Speaking of high speed buses - What is wrong with Sandra Bullock anyway? She can drive my bus anytime. In the network, the HSB is really the standard network bus we use with our computers. It's just a lot faster compared to the serial port/RS232/NMEA baud rate. This enables you to utilize your laptop as a true repeater for your system. So while you're lying seasick in your bunk, you can monitor the progress of your 'best helmsman" as you speed towards Madeira. While you're doing your install - have you considered adding the video camera function too? That way you will never have to leave your cabin until you hit the Canaries! Let me know if you want any more suggestions on how to spend your money.
If you're explaining to Giu it's falling on deaf ears. He has no clue about electronics and computer technology. Suffice to say that a bus is a path to send data between devices.

I think the best bet is to take all the parts to the installer and tell them what you want to do and what you want him to NOT do (cut big holes) and let them figure out the best way to integrate the 2 devices.
 

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Jody-

Said that before I realized that Raymarine's RayStar 125 was a complete GPS unit in the shape of a mushroom antenna, not just an antenna.

Your wrong... all About NMEA.. If the gps is 018x complaint or NMEA 200X... doesn't matter...

It'll feed......
 

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Jody, NMEA 200x is problematic and non-standard among vendors. NMEA 18x is still the more common and more compatible protocol, although even there you will find 180 and 183 are not always compatible or supported by the same equipment.

GPSes will usually work below the deck--IF AND ONLY IF they use one of the generation 3 chipsets, like a SiRFStar, which have only become common in the last couple of years. Generation2 equipment is more problematic and first generation GPSes won't work below deck at all, even if it is a thin fiberglass deck. Take any ten year old "premium" brand handheld GPS and try to use it below deck, you'll see them lose the birds.

The new Gen3 equipment is an incredible change, it even works tucked in between the sun visor and the metal roof of a car--which means it is picking up only the "bounce" from the car's interior floor. Same for the Gen4 equipment which is even tinier and uses less power as well.

My antique Garmin will work below deck--if you plug in the external antenna. Once upon a time, passive and semi-standard external antennas were sold for this but the marine "mushroom" antennas often are active (powered, with electronics in them not just an antenna) and specific for the model they were made for.

FWIW.
 
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