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We are chartering a 46' cat in a few weeks and although we have many years in mono's and smaller cats I have a mooring ball question (pertaining to this lg cat). Would it be best to approach a mooring ball so that we come to rest with it just off the starboard haul? That way I will be able to see it from the helm the entire time as we come up on it and I don't have to worry about crew member hand signals etc...
 

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Set up your mooring bridle before hand. Ensure that the legs of the bridle are one point five times longer then the boat is wide. this will reduce the load on each leg.
Put a quick release hook or a pendent at the apex of that bridle.
With the legs of the bridle that long you can make your approach on the side you are most comfortable with and bring the boat up to the ball at bare steerage way and bring her to a stop with the bow just over lapping the ball. The person on the bow will then have an easy time picking up the mooring pendent hanging from the ball and hooking up to your bridle.
Back easy for a very short moment to move away from the ball.
 

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Does anyone have a good pictorial representation to properly set up a bridle for anchoring and/or mooring on a cruising catamaran?

Thanks
 

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We are chartering a 46' cat in a few weeks and although we have many years in mono's and smaller cats I have a mooring ball question (pertaining to this lg cat). Would it be best to approach a mooring ball so that we come to rest with it just off the starboard haul? That way I will be able to see it from the helm the entire time as we come up on it and I don't have to worry about crew member hand signals etc...
I'm sure you could pick it up off the starboard hull but then you'd have to walk it around to the center of the two hulls to attach the second bridle. Not so easy on a large vessel. Really, the easisest thing to do is approach slowly into the wind. The use of the twin screws makes approaching the ball one of the easier manuvers in operating one of these big beasts.
The key is a dead on approach, slowly and into the wind. From the wheel you should be able to see it up until the last minute. Then have your bowman point and simply use the engines forward on one/reverse on the other. No need to use the wheel.
Have fun.
 

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Does anyone have a good pictorial representation to properly set up a bridle for anchoring and/or mooring on a cruising catamaran?

Thanks
For mooring: No picture here but we always use two separate bridle lines. One bridle goes from the port bow cleat through the mooring pendant eye (or through the eye on the mooring ball if there is no pendant) back to the same port bow cleat and one bridle goes from the starboard bow cleat through the mooring pendant eye back to the same starboard bow cleat. The two lines are redundant and seem to work well to reduce the chafing you would find if you used a single bridle from one cleat to the other.

For anchoring: Generally large crusing cats have a pre-rigged chain bridle that attaches to the anchor chain so when anchored the load is transfered to both hulls. Are you trying to set one up or are you talking about chartering?
 

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I am fairly confident that most charter companies will cover mooring and anchoring procedures. Boasun's procedure will work great but may differ from what your charter company requires.

Another method that seems to be preferred by charter companies in the VI is to have a line with the bitter end on your starboard cleat (your choice), approach so the starboard hull is on line with the mooring, slow to a near stop right on the ball, pick up the mooring pennant, run your line through the eye and back to the same cleat making it as short as possible so that you can easily reach it from the boat. If you haven't already, you can leisurely run another line from your port cleat over in front of the boat to the starboard side and loop it through the mooring penant and then back to the port side. Now you can slowly let out some line from the starboard side until your two lines are about the same length creating a penant with two seperate lines.

You should have an anchor bridle already on the boat ready to go.
 

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When I saw the title of this thread my initial thought was: "That doesn't sound like such a smart thing to do.":eek:

:D :D
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Hardware?

I love the idea of a quick release shackle, but I can't imagine I will find one big enough to hold a boat this size. But if one exists it would make life really easy for my greenhorn crew. Not that it is such a difficult task to just run a line through the pendent anyway, but the concept of setting up a bridle for the week is an attractive one....
 

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There is another good reason to do this... shorten the line when the wind is light..

For mooring: No picture here but we always use two separate bridle lines. One bridle goes from the port bow cleat through the mooring pendant eye (or through the eye on the mooring ball if there is no pendant) back to the same port bow cleat and one bridle goes from the starboard bow cleat through the mooring pendant eye back to the same starboard bow cleat. The two lines are redundant and seem to work well to reduce the chafing you would find if you used a single bridle from one cleat to the other.

For anchoring: Generally large crusing cats have a pre-rigged chain bridle that attaches to the anchor chain so when anchored the load is transfered to both hulls. Are you trying to set one up or are you talking about chartering?

and the ball will not bang against the hull (if the legs are shorter than the beam). Slack it off again when it pipes up (because the strain goes way up).
 

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For mooring: No picture here but we always use two separate bridle lines. One bridle goes from the port bow cleat through the mooring pendant eye (or through the eye on the mooring ball if there is no pendant) back to the same port bow cleat and one bridle goes from the starboard bow cleat through the mooring pendant eye back to the same starboard bow cleat. The two lines are redundant and seem to work well to reduce the chafing you would find if you used a single bridle from one cleat to the other.

For anchoring: Generally large crusing cats have a pre-rigged chain bridle that attaches to the anchor chain so when anchored the load is transfered to both hulls. Are you trying to set one up or are you talking about chartering?
I am talking about anchoring. I am buying a catamaran, and just trying to get info before I get delivery.
 

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Release hooks

There are various kinds of quick release hooks.
But for a mooring with a light vessel... A McCulney hook would work great.
For larger vessel you may want a pelican hook. Now that is a heavy duty hook. But then I'm thinking of vessel over a 100 tons gross.

There are various ways of rigging these hooks but if you go with a pelican hook it is best to have it on deck.
 

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Though I like the secondary bridle idea, I suggest there is too much slack.

If one leg breaks the boat will be anchored by one bow until the other leg breaks. There is a fair chance it will sail the anchor out in that period.

I also suggest examining the front beam design. Some can stand a pull well, others are compression beams and will come out. Then the mast falls, and other bad stuff.

I suggest that only 1-2' of slack (just enough to allow for stretch under load)between the bridles would be desirable, but would like to hear the counter argument. If the briddle is designed so that it will fail at the apex without redudancy, then this point is mute.

The problem with webbing for chafing gear is that some do not anchor it in place properly. Maybe they use some tape or believe in velcro. It will easily slide out of place... because it is slippery. Melt a hole in it ~ 1" from the end and tie it to the eye splice or other fixed point. You really cannot tie it to the line - it will slide.

No more problem. I've used the stuff for 20 years.
 

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Use chain for your anchor bridle and be sure that is riding in a metal chock & chaffing plate and not on fiberglass. Chain does nasty things to fiberglass...:eek:
 

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speaking of mooring

I am trying to moor a trimaran 17 foot with a hydrofoil system. The hydrofoils are like wings that are under the boat. This makes mooring difficult because they will easily cut through mooring lines. The first lines I used were too long and the wings cut the lines.

The other problem is that there is no cleat on the bow of the boat. So I need to run a short line through the bowsprit, but it starts to chafe very quickly. Most mooring lines are also at least 12 feet. I think I need approximately a 9 foot rope.

Does anyone have a suggestion for the optimum distance for a mooring line to the bow?

Troy
 
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