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Hi there, long story short i am from powell river bc canada. I have a Grampian 26. It has a big diesel so i keep it moored on the ocean and for years i just used it for motoring n fishing. Quite recently i have decided to figure out how to sail. I was told the boat will never flip over due to the fact once it gets too far over it will spill off and the keel will pull her back down. Well i was in 20 to 30km winds? The other day, pretty gusty trying out some new skills, i was in a 15 degree to the wind closed hull position with a medium sized jib and my main and we were cruising along when a gust came up and pretty much put my window in the water. Everything inside was everywhere. My question is will it actually flip over due to wind?
 

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Senior Moment Member
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Nope - the only thing that would roll a boat like that is wind AND sea - you'd have to get hit badly by a pretty big wave.

Rolling a G26 in the Salish Sea would be quite an accomplishment. :D

Due to the fact that those boats have almost non-existent side decks, getting the rail down pretty well ensures some water against the ports.
 

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Sounds like you had way to much sail up for the conditions. You need to learn about reefing. While "flipping over" is not likely, a knock down in strong winds and doing some stupid is possible.
 

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One of None
Hunter 34
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What do you mean "Big diesel"??
 

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I'm beginning to suspect some Trollery here - that engine would fill the majority of the main cabin in a G26.

15 degrees AWA? In a Grampian? Or anything for that matter.
 

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Senior Smart Aleck
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My question is will it actually flip over due to wind?
Yes, this is called a "barrel roll" - the boat will keep on rolling until you come up on the other side. Airplanes do it all the time.

Now, you need to practice your loop d' loop. Bury the bow in the water in a following sea, then flip the entire boat through a complete loop.

Then tie your boat up to your ocean mooring.;)

Both maneuvers will help keep your mast and sails clean! Practice make perfect!
 

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Old enough to know better
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I will send you a pic of my engine when I'm down there. And 15 was a guess I'm new to sailing. I'm starting to think this whole trying to get help on here was a mistake.
Well, don't let this scare you. Go to the Politics/Religion/War/Government section if you want to be scared off. I think you just need to work on the terminology a bit. While some of it seems kind of random and just there for snobbery purposes, it is actually there to give clarity to situations. If you consciously use port and starboard, you won't have to worry about "my left or your left" issues. It can save your boat, as well as marriages.

Most folks here like to claim the sail off the dock, and have not turned there motor on for 6 years. Well most of those folks are full of it, OK we do have a few folks here who have no motor, but most use it more than they admit. But I do have to say using it only for a few years is pushing it. Sailboats make lousy power boats, so use the sails, save diesel and enjoy the peace.
 

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grumpy old man
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Matt:
If you are close hauled and both sails are drawing you will see an "apparent wind angle"
(AWA) on your boat around 32 to 34 degrees. This will translate to a true wind angle (TWA) of about 46 degrees. I know it probably sounds bit geeky and complicated now but in time you will need to know these terms so you can communicate accurately.
Welcome aboard. You have survived the hazing ritual.
 

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I will send you a pic of my engine when I'm down there. And 15 was a guess I'm new to sailing. I'm starting to think this whole trying to get help on here was a mistake.
There are several people on sailnet whom would rather jump in and give someone a bunch of crap for asking a question that isn't up to their standard. Sad really. My advice, toughen up or don't come in because nothing is going to change.
 

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It's unlikely the boat would flip over but I assume it is not impossible if you get caught in some surf towards the beach or shallow areas.

Beyond the danger of flipping over I would be cautious with accidental jibes that could slap the boat (and your face) and make it round up into the wind really fast with a dangerous heeling angle. Not to mention the possibility of leading to mast failure in extreme cases.

Reef the sail more than you need to for now when the wind is a little stronger and read the theory. Maybe fly just the jib/genoa to get familiar with sheeting etc...

Learning to sail can be a little frustrating at times as the boat will behave differently depending on the wind speed, sea state and sail configuration (and quality) and what "should" work does not always.

At least with that engine you have the raw power to recover from a mistake.
 

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grumpy old man
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Matt:
You would have to be out in horrendous conditions with gale force winds and breaking seas to flip that boat over. You may experience a "knock down" from time to time when the side decks are awash. But unless you are flying a spinnaker in a gale you are not going to put your spreaders in the water. The boat will knock down, round up and spill the wind then right itself 99 out of 100 times. Make sure your drop boards are in the companionway and locked in those conditions.
 

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One of None
Hunter 34
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I was like "duh" when the OP said "big diesel" Now I wonder if it's aft and has the boat's trim all out of whack since he said it's a 4 cyl westie.
 

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Master Mariner
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I would highly recommend you find a copy of Royce's Sailing Illustrated. It is an inexpensive little book that will give you all the information you need to understand sailing and pretty much everything else about your boat in a rather fun format.
It will be especially helpful when conversing with these stuck up, know it alls, on here that insist everyone should know the proper term for every single rope on a boat. Shut up you guys, there are ropes on a boat, as well as lines. Who wants to list them for this guy?
As for tipping over, at a certain point, the windward rail will block the wind to the sail, so without a big sea ("I mean big, this big" he says as he spreads his arms as far as he can) to push you farther, that will limit the amount you can tip.
 
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