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I would crew on her too along with the other 12 guys you will need to sail her. she is a nice boat for someone with a lot of $$$$$$ to bring back this old out of date race boat only to go out and get your but kicked. Fun to sail on yes, to own not so much.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I would crew on her too along with the other 12 guys you will need to sail her. she is a nice boat for someone with a lot of $$$$$$ to bring back this old out of date race boat only to go out and get your but kicked. Fun to sail on yes, to own not so much.
Can you give us the low down on this boat? Seems none would be built as solid as this. Would not this boat be a good world cruiser? Needs some work but all the systems are so simple and everything looks accessible does not look to be too bad of a job. I would consider it if I did not already have a boat, and do not need one this size, but for the right person in the right situatioin, looks like you could have a great deal, depending on sales price of course.
 

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I would venture to say that it has been EXCEPTIONALLY maintained! Those guys don't slack on maintenance. Perfect large family boat. ;)
 

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What's interesting is at the bottom of the page, a 51-Morgan Out Island, also being auctioned off. Unfortunately, the boat looks like it was shot up by a machine gun.


Gary :cool:
 

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the cruising possibilities look pretty nice with this one. if I didnt already have a boat I would seriously look at it.. heck I already have a boat and Im looking at it.
 

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I crewed on that boat when I was on their Racing Committee. Sweet! Complicated.
No way will it please a cruising couple unless they are Pardey types. imho.
My guess is that no matter what the bid, it will go to some other government or civic entity. The Navy just wants a depreciation #.
Dick
 

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Buy it for $50K. Sail her to Chagauramas, Trinidad for a refit. Put $75-$100K** plus some sweat equity in her and you've got a solid, ready to go world crusier. If you're not fussy about the cosmetics, cut these refit figures by 1/3. All it takes is money and knowledge. Oh, I forgot -- it takes time too.

Don't forget the survey and a really well researched budget.
 

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Very solid, but VERY spartan interior...think attack sub. Also, as stated, they are old-school PHRF/IOR race designed with heavy spin poles and foil head stay - so complex and as stated, slow by today's racing standards. Also that 7'3" draft will make it tough when the water gets thin.

On the plus side, the rig is mil-spec and only 400hrs on the engine. Seems like it could be a contender for world-cruiser with some mods.
 

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That's what I thought. Depressing, ( spartan is a good word ) interior.
 

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Opening bid of $25... No takers?

Yeah, the interior is not designed to my taste, and the non-skid could use some work, but I cannot imagine a more solid boat.
 

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Learning the HARD way...
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What's interesting is at the bottom of the page, a 51-Morgan Out Island, also being auctioned off. Unfortunately, the boat looks like it was shot up by a machine gun.
That boat looks like it was T-Boned - at least 3 times... Is the parquet floor standard? That engine room looks scary!
 

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What's interesting is at the bottom of the page, a 51-Morgan Out Island, also being auctioned off. Unfortunately, the boat looks like it was shot up by a machine gun.


Gary :cool:
Yea I am not sure why that boat is even in the Navy inventory. Looks like it was Sandy damage banging against the pilings. Perhaps it was abandoned in there marina by a service member? That thing is going to need more than buffing out! Looks like it may even have sunk there is what looks like mud on top of the stove.

Opening bid of $25... No takers?

Yeah, the interior is not designed to my taste, and the non-skid could use some work, but I cannot imagine a more solid boat.
Bidding does not start till the 17th. I will likely put in a low ball bid just in case it is like the aircraft carrier that sold for $1. I imagine they will sell for not too much, but more than I would want to spend. They will take a lot of money to bring them up to a pleasure craft standard. The interior is a bit spartan, but not that bad. Set up the v-birth the way you like it. Not all bad.
 

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Yea I am not sure why that boat is even in the Navy inventory. Looks like it was Sandy damage banging against the pilings. Perhaps it was abandoned in there marina by a service member? That thing is going to need more than buffing out! Looks like it may even have sunk there is what looks like mud on top of the stove.



Bidding does not start till the 17th. I will likely put in a low ball bid just in case it is like the aircraft carrier that sold for $1. I imagine they will sell for not too much, but more than I would want to spend. They will take a lot of money to bring them up to a pleasure craft standard. The interior is a bit spartan, but not that bad. Set up the v-birth the way you like it. Not all bad.
She was one of 20 of the Mk I models that the Academy had built for there sailboat training program. they are replaced by 20 more of the same boat a MKII model in 2007 or so.
A Blog & A Boat that Need a Name
US Navy 44 Sail Training Craft | Clarence Holmes Photography
http://www.floatline.com/floatline/sail/page/68/
 

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She was one of 20 of the Mk I models that the Academy had built for there sailboat training program. they are replaced by 20 more of the same boat a MKII model in 2007 or so. the boat was not sunk. And good luck finding a V berth in a navy Racing boat
A Blog & A Boat that Need a Name
US Navy 44 Sail Training Craft | Clarence Holmes Photography
Well it won't come with a V-birth but one can certainly be built in. I know the history of the 44 foot boats, what I did not understand is the 51 foot Morgan Out Islander, that is the one that looks like it had sunk. It did not appear to be in a "Navy state of maintenance" by any stretch of the imagination, long before the holes in the side were beaten into it by the piers. It is rough, and looks to have been for quite a few years. May have belonged to someone who was deployed overseas or something, and just got neglected.





The 44's all look to be worn, but in good repair. Biggest issue for me would be the draft. being that they were based in Annapolis I would have expected it to be designed with less draft. The new boats are of new design, though quite similar in appearance, new hull designed by David Pedrick. But even the new ones are built solid, designed for continuous use for over 20 years. Practical Sailor has an interesting write up about them.

Wondering about the older 44s is there any reason they could not be set up (obviously with some work and expense) for short handed crews of say 2-3? They are set up currently to give the maximum exposure to the most number of sailors at a time. but are they inherently more difficult to handle? They seem like they are quite conservative hull designs so should be quite stable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Well it won't come with a V-birth but one can certainly be built in. I know the history of the 44 foot boats, what I did not understand is the 51 foot Morgan Out Islander, that is the one that looks like it had sunk. It did not appear to be in a "Navy state of maintenance" by any stretch of the imagination, long before the holes in the side were beaten into it by the piers. It is rough, and looks to have been for quite a few years. May have belonged to someone who was deployed overseas or something, and just got neglected.





The 44's all look to be worn, but in good repair. Biggest issue for me would be the draft. being that they were based in Annapolis I would have expected it to be designed with less draft. The new boats are of new design, though quite similar in appearance, new hull designed by David Pedrick. But even the new ones are built solid, designed for continuous use for over 20 years. Practical Sailor has an interesting write up about them.

Wondering about the older 44s is there any reason they could not be set up (obviously with some work and expense) for short handed crews of say 2-3? They are set up currently to give the maximum exposure to the most number of sailors at a time. but are they inherently more difficult to handle? They seem like they are quite conservative hull designs so should be quite stable.
Here is all the information you need on the 44's. How they are built and how to sail one:
http://www.usna.edu/SailingTeam/lectures/navy44.php

I was reading the manual. It states one skipper and 2 skilled crew could safely sail the 44 in good conditions. I do not see why a 44 could not be set up for single handing. Might do away with the spinakar and reconfigure the running rigging/winches.

I am not quite sure how this auction web site is set up. I think they may take donations with proceeds going to government. I have seen 1920's good quality antique cars on this site up for auction that do not appear to have ever been used by the government. Maybe the other boats listed were donations.
 

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did not understand that you were talking about an Out islander. I have one across for me being used as a condo and the owner says it sails like one too. the 44's are nice boats but the layout is for a maximum crew size. to outfit one for a short crew would be expensive and still be a lot of work to sail with a large overlaping genoa just changing a sail takes three and a lot of work. the cost of new sails would be the deal breaker for me.
 

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did not understand that you were talking about an Out islander. I have one across for me being used as a condo and the owner says it sails like one too. the 44's are nice boats but the layout is for a maximum crew size. to outfit one for a short crew would be expensive and still be a lot of work to sail with a large overlaping genoa just changing a sail takes three and a lot of work. the cost of new sails would be the deal breaker for me.
The "Great Boat" I speak of is the Navy 44. The manual says you can safely sail with 3. Why not install a jib reefing furler and make the jib 100% or maybe a little less? Then not so much sail to deal with. My boat also was designed for larger overlapping genoa, but PO reduced to 100% jib and single handed around the world. The sail works great and speed of the boat is not effected much, and in strong wind, the smaller sail has better shape than a large roller reefed genoa.
 
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