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Farr 11.6 (Farr 38)
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Back during the oil crisis in the 1970's, I actually designed a schooner intended to be used commercially. The intent was to use it for deep long lining in the Atlantic where the winds generally were adequate to allow that to be profitable.


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We had looked at perhaps adapting a yacht for that purpose, but generally yachts trended to be too lightly constructed too be able to withstand the forces involved in carrying a significant amount of cargo, and lacked sufficient carrying capacity to make that work. Cargo haulers tend to be 'burdensome', meaning that they can carry a very large amount of weight relative to their dry weight displacement. The reason that the design above worked is that deep long liners do not need to carry all that much weight or volume to be profitable.

If I were trying to do what you are thinking or doing, I would try to find an old Baltic Trader. These were some of the last sailing commercial cargo haulers. They were3 brawny boats that could carry a lot and still get by with pretty small crews. Here is a couple examples of the type. Most were ketches and not schooners.

In the Mediterranean there are also Gulets and Galettas, but my limited experience with them is that they tend to be very poorly built and poorly designed.

Jeff
 
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Farr 11.6 (Farr 38)
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It gives some rough numbers suggesting current ship efficiency from a carbon footprint perspective is roughly twice as efficient as rail, 5 times more efficient than truck and 50 times as efficient as air freight.
Thank you for posting that. I knew ships were efficient but I never would have guessed that they were that much more efficient than rail. I don't know if this is still true but one of the efficiencies that diesel powered ships used to have is that they burned Bunker C, and that saved the energy losses and carbon footprint of refinement.

Jeff
 

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Farr 11.6 (Farr 38)
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I would think that in an ideal world, you might try to find a boat like the Liberty Clipper. (Originally the Mystic Clipper). I worked on the drawings for the Liberty Clipper when I worked for Charlie Wittholz in the early 1980's.

She was a steel hulled schooner built for the short trip charter trade. For a slew reasons she had a very large carrying capacity, was designed to be handled by a very small crew and was very robustly constructed.

But frankly, if I was committed to doing what you are talking about doing, I would consider a purpose built vessel. She would not necessarily look like any traditional working vessel out of the past. She would need to be 70 feet minimum up to maybe 100 feet. The hull should probably be multiple chine steel and the rig a more modern sail multiple mast rig with square top sails. She should probably be a centerboard boat with a retractable rudder so you could get into shallow enough water to do a roll off-roll on loading onto the shore.

That would be an expensive way to start, but it would give you the ability to have enough carrying capacity and operating efficiency to make the idea work.

JeffI
 

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Farr 11.6 (Farr 38)
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This is the ship you are talking about? shes perfect! :love:
Yes, that is the Liberty Clipper. I worked for Charlie Wittholz when she was being designed and constructed, doing a lot of the drawings.

If I were doing her today as a cargo-hauler. The hull shape would be a little different and her rig would be very different and a whole lot simpler.

Jeff
 
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