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I would take a look at the old coasting schooners used during the late 1800's to transport GA. longleaf pine lumber from Darien GA. around the world. Almost flat bottomed with huge centerboards to allow them to access the shallowest ports and could be beached if necessary with no ill effects.
Something like this would be good for western Alaska. The rivers ha e shallow bars at the enterence and going dry is pretty common during a delivery. Having a boat made for that would be helpful.
 

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Discussion Starter · #82 ·
I would take a look at the old coasting schooners used during the late 1800's to transport GA. longleaf pine lumber from Darien GA. around the world. Almost flat bottomed with huge centerboards to allow them to access the shallowest ports and could be beached if necessary with no ill effects.
Essentially thats the mans design. now designed modern ship build to hold a container but it has a flat bottom with retractable keels for accessing shallow areas and is able to be beached. can you tell me, in your knowledge the advantage and disadvantages of a flat bottomed ship? for example, a centerboard would be retractable but is there an disadvantage of not using a fixed keel?
 

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Essentially thats the mans design. now designed modern ship build to hold a container but it has a flat bottom with retractable keels for accessing shallow areas and is able to be beached. can you tell me, in your knowledge the advantage and disadvantages of a flat bottomed ship? for example, a centerboard would be retractable but is there an disadvantage of not using a fixed keel?
A normal(single)fixed keel, cannot take the ground upright. A bilge keel design(with two fixed keels, one on either side of the hull) would have the entire ships weight on those two appendages and it's rudder skeg. The coastal schooners and most all olden sailing ships carried most, if not all, of their ballast in the form of stone. When they arrived in the protected shallow waters of where they intended to"take on" cargo, the accepted practice was to jettison their ballast stone.Usually on land but sometime in the water. There are still piles of stone in the Altamaha River with flows near Darien,GA. The streets in Darien, Savannah, Brunswick GA, and Charleston SC., and New York City were all originally paved with ships' cast off ballast stone. Sometimes other heavy commodities would be used in lieu of or in addition to, stone. The great ships that plied the Australian wool trade often carried Darien GA. lumber, or other heavy machine goods to Perth and other Australian ports and returned home with the wool to the great manufacturing ports in Great Britain.
 
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