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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had a survey on my new boat over the winter. It came up that there was a little pinhole which showed signs of weeping water. There was water in the bilge during the survey so he recommended removing all the water and sealing the keel bolts with a little bit of sealant. This past weekend I sealed the keel bolts, in in my desire to take everything apart I drilled a few holed around the pinhole (water came out). This led me to using a Dremel to remove even more material and I was amazed/extremely confused about what I found. Attached are 3 pictures 0742 is of the location on the keel, 0744 is of the grooves in the keel, and 0748 is of the piece of fiberglass removed.

I am totally confused. Why are there grooves in the fiberglass… Why is there fiberglass over the lead. My past boat was barrier coat over lead. The difference between my past boat (New York 36) and the current boat (Frers 41) is the aft edge of the keel is curved (the curved part is not lead). Are these slats put in to support the tail edge of the keel? Or are these grooves/slats put in for another purpose???

Either way has anyone had any issues with water in these grooves before. If so how did you drain them all, are they all connected in one point? Where would the water come from?
 

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What are they made of? It looks like foam.

I would assume that the designer wanted a specific keel profile that was larger than the acceptable keel based on weight so they had to build out from the lead.
 

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grumpy old man
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I wopnder if the grp was not laid up as a "skin" then bonded to the lead. If that was the case maybe the grooves are to get more bonding area. Although I've never seen that before. It was not unusual to have a grp skin over lead as the grp was easier to fair.

Is this a Barry Carrol boat? If it is call Barry, tell him "Bob sent you". He's a nice guy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I wopnder if the grp was not laid up as a "skin" then bonded to the lead. If that was the case maybe the grooves are to get more bonding area. Although I've never seen that before. It was not unusual to have a grp skin over lead as the grp was easier to fair.

Is this a Barry Carrol boat? If it is call Barry, tell him "Bob sent you". He's a nice guy.
Bob, It is a Carrol Marine boat built in 1988, but they are no longer in business.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
What are they made of? It looks like foam.

I would assume that the designer wanted a specific keel profile that was larger than the acceptable keel based on weight so they had to build out from the lead.
The material is some sort of hard resin or some sort. It is not light weight like foam.
 

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Looks like they used a grooved tiling-type trowel on the keel and used that to bond a pre-layed-up skin to the keel, which probably incorporated the rounded trailing edge, and faired that overall.

The thick glue strakes probably allowed them to preposition the skin to the desired foil shape before it all set up??

Interesting discovery, though!!
 

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grumpy old man
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Bob, It is a Carrol Marine boat built in 1988, but they are no longer in business.
mm:
Yes, I know that. But if you could track Barry down he'd answer your question. Just mention my name. Blame me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
mm:
Yes, I know that. But if you could track Barry down he'd answer your question. Just mention my name. Blame me.
Bob,

I ended up taking your advice and got in contact with him. I did mention your name and he knew exactly who you are! Sounds like they ened up putting a skin of fiberglass on the keel to allow for better fairing as well as paint adherance. Extreamly nice guy!
 
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