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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What do people think will happen with this insurance claim? There was a 44 ft Hunter sailboat recently lost on the St Louis portion of the Mississippi River, of the Great Loop.

The problem started back on Oct. 5, when Michael Weber, a retired businessman and former Marine, and his girlfriend missed the exit for the Chain of Rocks navigation channel about three miles above St. Louis and kept going down the river until they actually hit the rocks. The St. Louis Fire Department rescued both of them, but their boat, named White Widow, was stuck.

The guy was traveling from Michigan around the Great Loop, trying to get his boat down to Mobile Alabama and out to the Gulf. Just above St. Louis he missed the entry into the Army Corps of Engineers barge canal that would have taken him through lock number 26.

He ended up going down the wild main river channel, that is not maintained for river boat traffic. Either he didn't know where he was headed, or the current took him down faster than he could motor back up river. He ended up grounding his boat on one of the shoals in that area, caused by a small series of low rocky waterfalls called The Chain of Rocks.
The local water rescue crew of the St. Louis Fire Department managed to pull him and his girlfriend off the boat. He got a Boat Tow US crew to come but they did not have any boat powerful enough to motor upriver against the current, and dislodge him from the rocks. They considered a barge and a crane, but the current was too swift, and the water too shallow,
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to get it stabilized and get him off. Then a storm came along, water rose, and one morning his boat was no longer there, and has not yet been found.

This cut off to the East, through the barge canal, is covered extensively in all of the guides to traveling the Great Loop, and is shown on charts. His boat got grounded right about where a major caution symbol is on the charts.

Considering this was a major navigational error on the part of the skipper, will his insurance pay for the loss of his boat, or will he be just out of luck because he didn't follow navigational guides?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Theres no mast on it... maybe they thought without the mast they could scoot down under the bridges?
That's typically what "Loopers" do to get a sailboat around the Great Loop. You can sail all over the Great Lakes but they have the mast taken down in Chicago before motoring under the bridges on the Illinois River and then the St. Louis area bridges. Then they step the map again in Mobile. Many mount the mast on a cradle on deck. This guy must have shipped his south. Now he has a mast for a Hunter 44, but not the boat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
No, it probably got holes torn in the bottom rocking around on the rocks for 2 weeks, then got blown loose by the storm and sank. This is on the very muddy Old Man River Mississippi. The water is heavily silted, and already has plenty of diesel fuel floating on the surface. And the boat could have sank with the fuel tank in tact, so the oil spill will be very slow and gradual. Most of the water in that Wild on dredged part of the river is 10 ft. The boat will appear sometime next summer when the Army Corps of Engineers lets the water level drop some.
 
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