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We usually lose a sailboat down the rapids every year or so here. It's a hazard of river sailing. Engine failure, fouled rig, navigation errors can all contribute. You are often crowded by commercial traffic.

Suck a bag or wrap a prop on the ocean? Heave to or drift and fix it. Suck a bag or wrap a prop in the wrong place on a big river? Things can go sideways quick.

I don't know if the boats insurance will cover that situation or not, but I would say it's at least possible. Go out in a snow storm in your car and slide off the road your insurance is probably going to cover it :)
 

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A couple of shots of a similar cut we have in our neck of the woods. Big river with rapids and a narrow canal that every one needs to squeeze over into.

This first shot the ship over taking me is squeezing me over onto the river bank, my prop wash was muddy. Being under 20 meters, I am obligated to not impede his navigation in a narrow channel. He is about 700 feet long.

Water Sky Watercraft Lake Cap


This next shot shows the overtaking guy had no choice but to squeeze me, because he is getting squeezed by another big ship exiting the canal. Now, I have no idea if the guy with the Hunter was distracted by commercial traffic or not, but it's a possibility so I am happy to give him the benefit of the doubt because I don't know how much he had on his plate when he missed the cut :)
Water Sky Cloud Boats and boating--Equipment and supplies Watercraft
 

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YIKES.... insane to try to navigate in such narrow channels with commercial traffic like this.
This is what the Great Loop is. About 6000 miles of it. St Lawrence Seaway/Great Lakes, Mississipi, Gulf Coast ICW, Atlantic Coast ICW, New York State Canals. Have to cover about 500 miles a month to stay in season.

Its right on the top of my list of big trips when I find the time.
 

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Bummer. Missed the sign for the cut. A few take aways.

1) before embarking on a major voyage in unfamiliar waters, it's worth while to make a detailed voyage plan and make notes about known hazards in a format that is easily accessible on the water.

2) in inland or near coastal waters, review the days passage and make note of critical course alterations and known hazards, including weather.

3) leverage technology. A $30 autoroute app could alert a skipper to a major river hazard.
 

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Commercial traffic never really slows down here. In a lot of ways I prefer the commercial traffic to the week end warriors. We have a summer spot on this section of river so we are out sailing with the ships all the time. Most of the time they don't really bother us. Kids like seeing them.
 
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