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Discussion Starter #1
Hi I am Peter Bosman writer and filmer. I am making a cruising guide of the Netherlands. And while doing that (in my old Westerly Centaur) I also make video's for fun.

Her is one I made during a storm. I found an escape harbour but the army had gun practices there!

Find it on youtube: Sailing in a storm with gunshots and mortars at Breezanddijk
 

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Very interesting...escape harbours...the harbours of refuge as we say in Canada.

Good luck with the cruising guide!
 

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Thanks, I guess refuge harbour is the better name for the place. In Dutch it is vluchthaven. 'Haven'=harbour/harbor and 'vlucht' is escape or refuge or flight. So I choose the wrong one :) for the translation.
 

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Very interesting. I liked and subscribed in case you do more videos. I don't think we would be allowed to get that close to artillery practice in Canada, but I haven't tried either.

The escape harbours, were they built by the Dutch government specifically so small craft could hide from dirty weather?
 

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There used to be "Harbours of Refuge" in many places in Canada. Often they were man-made anchorages with artificial breakwaters. Now, some have been turned into marinas, no anchoring allowed...like Kingston ON Confederation Basin.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
The harbours were used during the build of 'the Afsluitdyke' . The other escape harbours I know were also build on/near dykes. They are also called work-harbours. Most of them are build by the ministry of traffic and waterworks (Rijkswaterstaat).
The places are not as busy as the normal marina's and I visited some other 'escape harbours' as well. I am editing one now and I hope I can publish it one of these days.
 
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