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I sail an Endeavour 32 and I am looking for some ideas to help prevent halyard slap. All of the halyards are external to the mast. The cleats and winches are covered up by the sail cover. I've tried loosening everything up and using bungies, looping the halyards around the spreaders, and nothing sems to work real great. Right now the mast looks like a cat's craddle, and it takes a half an hour to set it up. Is there anything short of running my halyards inside the mast that will help quiet them?
 

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We use bungies and for us, anyway, it works fine. Once the halyard is "bungied" - tighten it a bit.

Rik
 

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Once you get below the spreaders can't you just wrap them around the mast a few times and tie them off...???
 

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Are you sure it's the halyards that are slapping and not the wiring inside the mast? That's a little tougher problem to solve but possible the next time you un-step the mast.
 

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Take the business ends (shackles) to the deck, preferably toe rail or deck padeye/handrail/stanchion base etc.. that will eliminate half the lines against the mast. If bungies don't work for you cut a pool noodle in half and put them around the mast under the tensioned halyards, maybe two of the within reach of deck level. The main halyard can be taken either to the deck or the end of the boom.
 

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Here is what I do to some extent . Lets just start with the main halyard ,first take the aft end and (does that end have a shackle?) clip it to something so that the line does not touch the mast . Now take the forward end tie it (again away from the mast) to something and make it so the halyard is tight . I don't know how you have your head sail rigged , but you get the picture . Hope that helps .
 

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Here is what I do to some extent . Lets just start with the main halyard ,first take the aft end and (does that end have a shackle?) clip it to something so that the line does not touch the mast . Now take the forward end tie it (again away from the mast) to something and make it so the halyard is tight . I don't know how you have your head sail rigged , but you get the picture . Hope that helps .
Simpler still! ;)
 
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On my Endeavor 32 my main Halyard has a tail about a foot from where it connects to the top of the sail that loops the cleat on the port side, so I just use the winch for the main to tighten so that never slaps regardless of how windy it gets.
 

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I've got external halyards as well, I'll try to explain what I do.

I take the tail of both ends of the halyard to a cleat below the main sail cover and hook them around the end of the spreader. I don't have a pic but imagine the halyards angled away from the mast from the base, outside of the cover, up to the spreader boot, then angled back to the top of the mast.

I do this for both sides of both halyards.
 

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I fasten the main wire halyard to it's downhaul around the covered sail with the working end tied off to itself thru the grab rails on cabin top.
Jib halyard is left clipped to the jib and around the forestay, secured to the deck via it's downhaul to the fwd cleat, THe free end is like-wise looped thru the port hand rails and tied off.
The only "slapping" I get is the unsecured cables/wires inside the mast :grr:
 

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..... so I just use the wench for the main to tighten so that never slaps regardless of how windy it gets.
Lucky you, whenever I tell my wench to tighten up the main she just tells me to get of my lazy arse and do it myself.....:(
 

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I made and installed small pin rails and pins for the shrouds on both sides similar to

pinrail.jpg

and I take both ends of all halyards to the pins.

I made my rails from a piece of rough maple shoring that I milled to dimension and gave a boiled linseed oil bath at high temp. The pins are made from inch and a quarter dowel drilled to accept bronze rod I bought from a website that provides material for making knives (5/8 inch diameter). The rail idea is detailed in Brian Toss's "Rigger's Apprentice" and the pins in Bruce Bingham's "Sailor's Sketchbook."

I used to have a lot of mast slap...now I get none no matter high brisk the wind.
 

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I clip the working ends to the lifelines on one side of the boat and tie off the bitter ends to individual stanchions/bases. Keeps everything well away from the mast.
 

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Haven't read all the replies so this may be redundant.
I solved my problem by mounting nylon cleats horizontally on the fore and aft edges of the spreaders, about a foot or more from the mast. I loosen the halyards, flip them over a cleat and belay them on their mast cleats. Holds them away from the mast, where they are totally silent. Loosen them and flip them back off to raise the sails.
I cut one horn off each cleat and smoothed the stub, as inboard horns obviously aren't necessary. Use 4" cleats--big enough to hold several halyards. I found 3 cleats work fine for my cutter with 7/16" rigging. I suppose you could fashion hooks out of wood, too.
I think I got the idea from Don Casey's book, but not sure.
John V.
 

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Now that is a clever idea VallelyJ
 
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