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Farr 11.6 (Farr 38)
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I can't speak to the installation question in any detail, but I would mainly like to comment on the resale issue that you raised near the end..

My only comment on the installation issue is that the preparation for some of these systems is actually more demanding than the prep for paint.

To explain. Some of the faux teak decks are self-adhering. And those require perfect preparation in order for the thin layer of adhesive to properly bond to the deck below, and also not telegraph any irregularities.

Other systems, use a trowel or roll on adhesive with gap bridging properties. While harder to apply those systems can escape some of the prep issues that come with the self adhering systems.

The preferences for a teak deck or not seems to be a regional thing and a very personal preference thing. The European marketplace seems to have a much stronger preference for teak decks, or faux teak decks than North America and perhaps the rest of the world.

For example. Beneteau told me that they just about can't sell teaked decked models in North America and even minimize the teak from the cockpit of boats intended to be sold in North American vs. a large percentage of the boats sold in the EU opt for teak decks. The same is true for J-boats.

So in terms of resale, I would suggest that adding the faux teak decks should be seen through a lens based on where you plan to sell the boat as well as your own preferences.

Regarding Kiwigrip. I did homework on using Kiwigrip for my own boat. I think that it is a good product and looks good when it is applied carefully. ( I will note that my boat had decks that still had molded in non-skid, and which had been painted previously painted. So this may not fully apply to your case.)

I ended up painting my decks with a conventional paint because the boats I had seen with Kiwigrip looked a little more amateurish than boats with non-skid paint jobs.

In terms of resale my feeling is that Kiwigrip makes sense on older less valuable boats where nothing will raise the sales price above a low threshold. But, my sense is that Kiwigrip potentially diminishes the value of a bigger more expensive boat.

If you are in a marketplace where teak decks are valued, my sense is that the more expensive custom plank layout will add to something to resale value, but even if it doesn't add the full cost difference, it would make the faux teak more appealing to a larger group of buyers so potentially the boat might sell more quickly.

Jeff
 

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Super Moderator
Farr 11.6 (Farr 38)
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10,530 Posts
I am sorry, I probably should have made that point more clearly. My boat never had teak decks. That is what I meant to by saying that my experience does not fully correspond to your situation. I only intended to mention my boat's project decisions in reference to your question about using Kiwigrip and my perception of how Kiwigrip might impact resale value.

I don't really know how the deck below your teak is finished and whether you can remove the teak without damaging the non-skid, or even if there is non-skid under the teak. If you haven't spoken with Beneteau, you want to might contact Beneteau to see what their thoughts are. In the past I have exceptional services out of Bene3teau's legacy tech support.

Jeff
 

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Super Moderator
Farr 11.6 (Farr 38)
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You may already have done this, but it could prove helpful to determine what specific sealant/adhesive Beneteau used. Depending on the specific adhesive you may be able to use chemical strippers and poltice the deck in order avoid a mechanical method that is potentially more likely to damage.

Of course the problem greatly escalates if the sealant contains silicone which gets into the pores of the gelcoat and potentially makes adhesion of new finishes much less reliable.

I don't envy you but wish you the best of luck with your project.

Jeff
 

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Super Moderator
Farr 11.6 (Farr 38)
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It would seem like the preparation process would need to address at least a two or three part challenge; First removing the PU-50, then dealing with the screw holes, and ultimately potentially dealing with deck core issues at the fastenings depending on the water tightness of the fastening penetrations and the core materials. And all of that is before you decide what to do with the non-skid pattern. The closely spaced fastenings would suggest that you probably will not be able to salvage the original molded in non-skid pattern.

Regarding that process, I believe that PU-50 is a family of urethane based adhesive/ sealants. I had not heard of it being used in the marine production industry, but I guess that should not surprise me. In my experience, flexible urethanes tend to make sanding very difficult since they quickly clog sandpaper. That would suggest that you will probably need to use a chemical stripper to remove the urethane. Sikaflex makes a high quality chemical urethane remover that is supposed to compatible with Polyester resins, There are also urethane removers used in other industries like construction. They would probably be more affordable, but I don't know how effective they are and whether they play well with polyester gelcoat, and laminating resins.

The fastening holes are tough, especially if you wanted to end up with a gelcoat or painted (Kiwigrip) deck. My guess is that they will need to be reamed open and filled. That can probably be done with thickened polyester if you are overcoating with a waterproof material. But getting a good seal and stabile adhesion won't be easy.

Of course things get way more complex and expensive if of the fastenings have been leaking and the core has become damaged. The worst part of that is that you probably cannot fully detect that condition until the teak has been removed, and at that point, there is no turning back.

Maybe 30 years ago, I faced addressing a similar problem on a small race boat with a slew of abandoned bolt holes in the deck and very ineffective non-skid. For a while I leaned towards grinding down the original non-skid gelcoat to a level and fair surface., I was planning to apply new gelcoat to the deck and use Gibco Flex Mold Gibco Flex-Mold, Non Skid Surfaces to create a factory looking gelcoat pattern. Gibco makes both male and female molding materials. I was considering the female molding material, where you troweled on gelcoat, then rolled the female material over the wet gelcoat to mold in the non-skid pattern.

I decided that it was a great way to go, but that the boat in question was not worth the expense and effort (i.e. resale value of less than $3-4 K). We ended up filling the holes with thickened resin (I don't recall whether epoxy or polyester) and simply painting the deck with a scattered sand non-skid. It looked okay and was a vast improvement over the original non-skid, but I don't see that as an optimum way to go on a more valuable boat because it definitely looked like a after the fact solution rather than a factory, or high end post production solution.

Jeff
 
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