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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just sold my Potter 14 and am getting my Potter 19 ready for a summer on my leased buoy. The hatchboards that came with the boat were really bad and essentially delaminated. I tried to make a replacement out of Acrylic but kind of screwed up the hinge placement one of the hinges is a bit crooked and unless I can figure out how to patch and reinstall on Acrylic I need to come up with another hatchboard design. I have some 1/2 and 3/4" marine quality ply in my garage.

Could a two piece hinged hatchboard work out of plywood? I would epoxy the edges if needed or put multiple coats of varnish if needed.
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Just to clarify, it looks like the terms I was looking for was washboard, the board to close up my companionway.
 

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Congrats on the new boat. The 19 will be a lot more comfortable.

Yes, I think plywood would work fine. I have had entire boats made out of plywood, can't think of any reason it wouldn't work for a hatch board.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Cedar is light weight, weather resistant, much cheaper than the hardwoods, and very easy to work with.
Just an option....
I just happen to have a whole bunch of cedar sitting around from previous projects, just none big enough to want to work with. I will take inventory and see what I have to work with. What I am considering doing is making a lower board from wood then trying to reuse the acrylic for the upper portion.

If the hinge is done right, the lower board can flop to a position parallel to the sole of the cockpit and make a little table to dine off of.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Congrats on the new boat. The 19 will be a lot more comfortable.
Not new, just finally getting it lined up. I was trying to use it last year but my registration got lost in a Covid SNAFU, and it took to this year to commit to getting this boat on the water. The Potter 15 was a lot of fun last year and I will miss it but found the right person to finish what I started.

We expect some great adventures from the P19 including offseason travel to warmer climates.
 

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Farr 11.6 (Farr 38)
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On my Laser 28, I built hatch slides (washboards) out of marine plywood. Those plywood hatch slides lasted 14 years and still looked great. I coated the hatch slides all faces and all edges with epoxy. I painted the exterior and edges and only had varnish on the interior. I had a piece of aluminum 1/2"×1/8" flat bar on the bottom so the plywood wasn't sitting in water. I also used a wider strip of aluminum flat bar to keep the water from driving through the joint. I painted the aluminum to match the hatch slides.

Previously, for the boat before that one, I had made hatch slides out of mahogany plywood that I edged with mahogany. That was a lot more work but I chose to varnish those

Jeff
 

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Farr 11.6 (Farr 38)
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I just happen to have a whole bunch of cedar sitting around from previous projects, just none big enough to want to work with. I will take inventory and see what I have to work with. What I am considering doing is making a lower board from wood then trying to reuse the acrylic for the upper portion.

If the hinge is done right, the lower board can flop to a position parallel to the sole of the cockpit and make a little table to dine off of.
The problem with cedar is that cedar swells a lot. The issue will be that swelling can jamb the boards and shorten the life of the finish. But cedar is also comparatively soft and hatch slides tend to get tossed around a lot.

Jeff
 
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I've made several sets of hatchboards, all out of plywood. First and second time, I went to the trouble of finding and buying marine-grade ply. I epoxied and varnished those boards. I found that varnish was more trouble than it was worth; if you don't keep it up, it goes bad fast, and then all hell breaks loose. Once the top layer of ply gets weathered, it can't be "fixed". It always looks bad, no matter what you do. The third time, I considered switching to a solid wood design, but determined that the project would be beyond my limited carpentry skills. So I used regular outdoor-grade plywood, and regular old house paint. I didn't even bother to seal the edges with epoxy. That set of boards was the most durable, and looked the best with the least amount of maintenance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
So I used regular outdoor-grade plywood, and regular old house paint. I didn't even bother to seal the edges with epoxy. That set of boards was the most durable, and looked the best with the least amount of maintenance.
This is boat project #3 in recent years, only if you are counting sailboats, otherwise more. I have gotten into the habit of making offseason or repair washsboards. On my Potter 14 I made some temporary out of Home Depot external grade ply. For my S2 I had a sheet of 3/4 Okume and made a one pieced hatch so I could bring home and restore the teak originals.

The marine ply with a spray varnish did not hold up as well as the external construction ply left untreated.
 

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I made two sets.
The first were a work of art until the wood swelled up and my carefully crafted joinery fell apart.

The second was 3/4" plywood (any plywood will do) covered with glass and epoxy, sanded, faired, and painted with some leftover deck paint. They continue to serve me well and are damn near bullet proof.
 

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I've always thought it would be really cool to make a tambor which is a roll up. But it would quickly fill up with mildew dirt and other nasties and fall apart in short order! but they look nice on bread boxes!
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I guess I am the only one who votes for starboard.
I use plexi... it provide weather protection and lets light into the cabin.

Yes!!!!!!!!!!!!! Only a nutter would use wood on a boat left outside. As most of the forum has now fallen into the Nutter Category lets hope they enjoy the yearly varnishing, swelling edges, popping screws and lack of light when inside battened down from rain etc.

Hang on! I know the solution: Wooden companionway hatch, then add canvas above it to keep the weather off the wood; then a cover to keep the rain off the canvas; then something to keep the rain off the cover keeping the rain off the canvas keeping the rain of the wood. Purrrrrfect :)


Boats! :)


Mark
 
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One of None
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Yes!!!!!!!!!!!!! Only a nutter would use wood on a boat left outside. As most of the forum has now fallen into the Nutter Category lets hope they enjoy the yearly varnishing, swelling edges, popping screws and lack of light when inside battened down from rain etc.

Hang on! I know the solution: Wooden companionway hatch, then add canvas above it to keep the weather off the wood; then a cover to keep the rain off the canvas; then something to keep the rain off the cover keeping the rain off the canvas keeping the rain of the wood. Purrrrrfect :)


Boats! :)


Mark
Hey, there are wooden boat builders and restoration people here! (Because the maintenance issues with wood) I know is why I seek classic plastic) but it sure is purdee
 

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but it sure is purdee
Yes, they certainly are.

I was talking to a guy and he said he could never own my type of boat as its 'lines aren't purdee'.
I asked when he can ever see how pretty his boat is. U sure can't see it when you're aboard. Can't see its lines when it's sailing. Can't see them in a marina slip with boats next to it. When do you see how pretty your boat is?
"When I'm rowing up to it" he exclaimed.

When you're rowing you face the other way.

When do you see your pretty hatch covers? When you're not on your boat!!! 😂😂😂

Mark
 

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I spent A lot of time with making some “marine grade” ply hatch boards (three) for an Islander Bahama 30 we had. It was a fun project with the proper angled cuts (and venting) so they‘d seat nicely. And then the canvas cover.

when we bought our current Pearson 28-2 that had very nice acrylic hatch boards, I became a fan!.
 

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I guess I am the only one who votes for starboard.
You are not alone. Starboard was my first choice as a replacement for the plywood hatchboards. At least it was until I priced out the material. If I remember, the sizes of starboard available would have required the hatchboards to be in three or four pieces (instead of two), which greatly increased the cost. The plywood was waaaaay cheaper. I had enough plywood from the one 4X8 sheet to make three sets of hatchboards (as well as tackling some other projects).
 
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