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· Schooner Captain
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just sent out my hatch acrylic to be replaced.
They removed the material, and had it sent out to be cut from tempered glass 1/2" thick. The frame is aluminium.
What adhesive should I use to install the glass into the aluminium?
 

· Senior Moment Member
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795 is right. It might just be the way you worded your post but I hope they cut your glass to the correct size. You can't cut tempered glass - you cut the glass and then temper it.

A piece of tempered glass that doesn't fit is trash - have to start over.
 

· Señor Member
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UP,

Just in case they are giving you safety glass (two layers of glass with a mylar layer sandwiched between):

Before you bed the glass, seal the edges with epoxy. That will really help prevent water getting between the layers and causing the clouding that is pretty commonly seen.
 

· Schooner Captain
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
795 is right. It might just be the way you worded your post but I hope they cut your glass to the correct size. You can't cut tempered glass - you cut the glass and then temper it.

A piece of tempered glass that doesn't fit is trash - have to start over.
I have no idea what the process is. I know they ssaid they do not cut tempered glass, and had to send it out. $95 for a size 70 hatch, installed with my adhesive.
UP,

Just in case they are giving you safety glass (two layers of glass with a mylar layer sandwiched between):

Before you bed the glass, seal the edges with epoxy. That will really help prevent water getting between the layers and causing the clouding that is pretty commonly seen.
No sir, just tempered. Thank you thou. The glass will receive tinted hurricane film after its installed.
 

· Señor Member
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No sir, just tempered. Thank you thou. The glass will receive tinted hurricane film after its installed.
OK, just covering bases.

Speaking of which -- you've thought through protecting the glass from random gravity events (like dropped winch handles, blocks, etc.) right? As it is designed to do so, tempered glass is much more likely to shatter than safety glass.
 

· Schooner Captain
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
OK, just covering bases.

Speaking of which -- you've thought through protecting the glass from random gravity events (like dropped winch handles, blocks, etc.) right? As it is designed to do so, tempered glass is much more likely to shatter than safety glass.
going to have to be careful, but then...
 

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Probably clear tempered over tinted tempered with a hurricane rated PVB interlayer. Or, some other proprietary interlayer that will do the same. The glass will be amazingly impact resistant, but nick an edge and it disappears in a hail of tiny bits of glass. But only one layer will go. The other will remain intact. SO . If you plan on reglazing the hatch yourself be sure to 1) Tool the silicone joint and 2) protect the outside edge from being nicked by a flailing shackle or something. Do not skip tooling. I've heard many testosterone empowered boasts about how some guy is so good at caulking, he just guns it and runs. An untooled joint is not waterproof and professionally not warrantied. A wet finger drawn over the joint will do the trick but I prefer caulk joint smoothing spray (Home Depot) and a plastic spoon.
 

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If the "hurricane film" is a premium lexan film like 3M's SolarShield, it can be applied DIY on the inside, and it will hold shattered glass (tempered, whatever) together in one sheet after the impact. Won't stop something like a spinnaker pole from pushing the entire piece of glazing through, but typically WOULD mean the entire sheet has to come through, and there wouldn't be the usual shower of sharp shards and bits.

Some of those products (they have a number) cut IR and UV by almost 100%. Others are designed for buildings, to "bomb proof" ground floor windows, eliminating the shrapnel effect.
 
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