SailNet Community banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
216 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
We are blessed by the quality, sturdiness and affordability of 40 year old small fiberglass sailboats. I got mine on Craigslist for next to nothing, put some work into it, got the rigging replaced for not too much more money, and now I sail the hell out of it much farther, faster and more often than all of my friends who have spent over ten times as much on their larger yachts. Love the boat.

In keeping with my desire to keep my sailing habit affordable and my inclination to reuse/recycle I have a headsail from a similar boat which is about a 110 on mine. The foot comes all the way down to the deck. My boat has an IOR configuration with a small mainsail/huge headsail configuration. I love this smaller headsail when I go out on windy days in Puget Sound. But the tracks for my jib sheet blocks/cars are mounted WAY aft and when I use this headsail with these cars it doesn't set properly -the leech flutters and I can't point as well.

As a solution I have put two large snatch blocks on padeyes well forward near the shrouds and run the jib sheets through those. The sail sets nearly perfectly and I when beating I can get tacking angles of 85-90 degrees and course over ground (GPS course) with 95-100 degree angles between tacks.

My question is: is there any reason not to do this? The snatch blocks are stout, I believe they are intended for spinnaker sailing, and they are larger/thicker than the jib car blocks. Is there any safety issue. I would prefer not to install any unnecessary deck hardware.

Another question: if there is a reason to avoid my solution and I don't want to install another jib car track, what do you guys think about getting the jib tailored with a higher clew so that the jib lead angle would be appropriate when using my aft jib cars/blocks?
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
19,488 Posts
Nothing wrong with using those padeyes providing they are adequately backed/reinforced below decks. The main disadvantage is the loss of adjustability of the jib lead angle.

Recutting the sail to get back onto the track would simply cost you sail area, though it would improve visibility a bit.. if the hoist is already short another option would be to put a pennant on the tack and run the sail further up the headstay - same effect re jib lead possibly, and even more improved visibility forward.

Finally, running a jib lead block on an adjustable line running through the padeye would restore some jib lead trim function.. bringing the block down to the deck is like moving a car forward, letting it rise off the deck the same for bringing a car aft.

Just make sure that you're not likely to rip the padeye out of the deck one day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,303 Posts
I know of many folks that do this, OR, as I did, installed a short set of tracks on the cabin top.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,264 Posts
I prefer short track, but what you have done is perfectly fine. The problem is that you need a pretty substantial backing plate to handle sheet loads, and many people go to small. I didn't run the numbers, but something in the 10 in^2 range would be my guess for a backing plate.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top