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When racing seriously, a boat will sometimes carry a couple of #1 Genoas, one made of heavier material than the other. A very light #1 Genny will be useful in a very narrow range of wind strength, but will be great for that kind of light wind condition, especially upwind, when reachers and spinnakers are not usable. As the wind picks up, the light # 1 could be blown out or at least deformed so it is dropped and up goes the heavy #1, approximatly the same size, but stronger. I have never heard of a light #2 since if you need a lighter #2 you might as well go to a #1.

In addition, boats racing across oceans, such as the Transatlantic, need to carry spare sails since it is not at all unusual to blow out one or two over the course of weeks of racing round the clock. Usually one will be lighter than another, thus the terminology.
 

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I'll take a stab.........

"Heavy" most likely means the cloth weight, with heavy meaning
"offshore" or "capable" of handling much higher wind velocities. Most of the heavy weight cloths are in the 7 to 8 ounces/sq yard minimum. Light means a lighter weight cloth, typically for inshore or coastal conditions, anywheres from 4 to 7 ounces/sq. yard.

The numbers refer to the rank in order of relative size. A #1 typically refers to a headsail that has the max range of overlap for your boat, so it would be the largest. For some boats it is 180% of the fore triangle, some 160%, some 150%., a number to 2 would be smaller, maybe 140 to 120%, a #3 would be 90 to 110% ish, etc.

DrB
 
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VERY generally a #1 will be in the 155% range, a #2 would be say 135% and a #3 maybe 110... a #4 would depend on the rig, and then you're down to storm jib which is roughly the size of your underwear

You'd have a light #1 and a heavy #1, but the other sails aren't carried in different weights. Exception being something like a windseeker I guess, which an extremely light small-ish sail for use in conditions where peeing off the transom actually has a measurable impact on boatspeed
 

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What is a Code-0?
 

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While we can all hypothosize, the numbers of the % style showed up in the IOR days, I also believe the heavy/light #1 etc showed up at the same time too. A light #1 would be potentially for winds to 5-7 knots at best. A std #1 might be a 155 like the light one, and a heavy #1 would be slightly smaller in some cases to a 150 or so, along with heavier cloth. A std/med #1 would work up to say 15knots, a heavy to 20 or so knots.

A #2 or 3 or 4, Again, depending upon the boat, how big a headsail it can handle, ie a fractional with a max 110, all the above about lt and mde and heavy #1 go out the door, as your max will be a 110 all thru the wt range, with boats like mine, a #3 would be a 110 with a max Jib being a 155! some boats even can handle 160-180 jibs.

In th end, not sure you will get a simple this is it answer. As what a #1 etc will depend upon the boat and the skipper etc.

Marty
 

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When I raced on big boats, light and heavy had to do with apparent wind speed. The light was good to 10-12 after that the 1. The boat carried 28 sails and had something for everything, including trysail and blooper. If you've ever gone 14 knots under a blast reacher and two reefs, you know what a suit is.
 

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When I raced on big boats, light and heavy had to do with apparent wind speed. The light was good to 10-12 after that the 1. The boat carried 28 sails and had something for everything, including trysail and blooper. If you've ever gone 14 knots under a blast reacher and two reefs, you know what a suit is.
I've done 14 just barely cracked off onto a close reach :p with 3 reefs, and the main was 6' short of a full hoist so really, 4 reefs!

And no, you crazy multi zealots... it was on a mono
 

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When I raced on big boats, light and heavy had to do with apparent wind speed. The light was good to 10-12 after that the 1. The boat carried 28 sails and had something for everything, including trysail and blooper. If you've ever gone 14 knots under a blast reacher and two reefs, you know what a suit is.
Does anyone use bloopers nowadays? I've only seen them in photos on the covers of sailing books from the 80s. One of my goals in life is to fly as many sails at once as possible.
 

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Not sure what a blooper is, and how used. But I did pickup a 130'ish drifter/reacher a month ago, worked really well in some light up to 6 knot winds in a race Ap 4th. gained us about .5-1 knot vs the 155 carbon. Anything over that, the 155 gained us an additional knot.

Marty
 

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Bloopers, tallboys, reachers, bananas, and the one I've actually used, my genoa staysail with wire luff that tacks to the rail...they all have gone to die in the rafters of my garage.

Some of them emerge recut as one-season, sail 'em 'til they shred foresails. Others get to be paint or plaster tarps.
 

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Blooper thus:



It is (was, thank God) a low-slung mini-spi meant to counteract IOR boats' habit of rounding up violently under symmetrical kite alone. IIRC, it was counted as a jib and so also increased downwind sail area without a penalty hit.
 

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Blooper thus:



It is (was, thank God) a low-slung mini-spi meant to counteract IOR boats' habit of rounding up violently under symmetrical kite alone. IIRC, it was counted as a jib and so also increased downwind sail area without a penalty hit.
Trimmed by raising and lowering the halyard.

Now let us never speak of this abomination again
 

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The general theory is that for a racing boat that has a fixed max headsail dimension, a "Light" No. 1 would have a fuller draft and lighter material than the "Heavy" No. 1. The "Light" No. 1 would be a more powerful sail, fuller draft, yet not as high a pointing sail, enabling you to build speed and power through the chop that would slow a boat in light winds. In practice, the "Light" would go up to about 7 - 9 kts AWS and the "Heavy" would take it from there, to the No. 2's range, typically in the low to mid teens AWS. There really is no such thing as a "Light" No. 2 as that sail is optomized for higher wind speeds, and the next gear shift would be to the No. 3.

In addition, while feasable, you could have a "Light" mainsail and a "Heavy" mainsail, both with optomized drafts and materials for their expected wind ranges. I have sailed on boats, years ago, that had them, but sail count limits make them useless.

In regards to the comments about "Bloopers" helping to aleviate the IOR boats unstable downwind tendancies, I don't think so much... The Blooper was a VERY unstable sail, and never used in the highwind conditions that would create the combination of factors that would facilitate the famous IOR "Death Roll" or broach. They were exclusively used in light to moderate wind conditions, dead down wind running, and the proper technique actually had you LOWER the mainsail to gain the greatest benifits. Glad to see then go!

With the introduction of modern fractional rigged high performance boats, the mainsail was no longer relegated to a secondary role. The need for "Light" and "Heavy" headsails of the same size became secondary to the proper trim of the now larger and more powerful mainsails.
 

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Are light # 1 is good for 9 knots and the heavy #1 about 20

The light #1 3DL requires repiars EVERY race because the film is so thing it cant take wacking anything during a tack SO we really try not to use it :(
 

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Back in my racing days we flew a blooper on a Kiwi 30. Under the right conditions it was really fast dead down wind. Bloopin' helped us get many 1st place finishes. Most boat are designed to sail jibe angles downwind now so you don't see them much.
 

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Well I have one for you. My boat has a spinnaker staysail which I have and have flown a couple of times on our 1967 Chris Craft Apache sloop (S&S). It basically throws a little more wind into the spinnaker.

Moe
 
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