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Discussion Starter #1
I think this may be a bad idea, but my wife just suggested we get headsets to be able to speak with each other between the helm and bow. We've always successfully used hand signals, there is no way to actually hear each other, especially with wind.

Not a huge problem expect those occasional times when you have the boat hook in one hand, the mooring line in another and a good wind or current is going to pull the bow away before you route the line around the pulpit, through the chock and to the cleat.

She would like to just say to pull it forward a bit, when she is on the bow. (I have seen her get flustered and toss the boat hook overboard) I'm concerned that, from time to time, one of us may use a tone that is left better to hand signals. ;)

Anyway, I really don't like the walkie talkie setups, with a cable to a headset. What a contraption for such a minor need.

Is anyone aware of a self contained headset, with no wires to a separate radio? I might consider it, but still think this could be a bad idea.
 

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Marriage Saver headsets by Cruising Solutions.

Working fantastic for us with over 2 years full time cruising. One of our best purchases.
 

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I think this may be a bad idea, but my wife just suggested we get headsets to be able to speak with each other between the helm and bow. We've always successfully used hand signals, there is no way to actually hear each other, especially with wind.

Not a huge problem expect those occasional times when you have the boat hook in one hand, the mooring line in another and a good wind or current is going to pull the bow away before you route the line around the pulpit, through the chock and to the cleat.

She would like to just say to pull it forward a bit, when she is on the bow. (I have seen her get flustered and toss the boat hook overboard) I'm concerned that, from time to time, one of us may use a tone that is left better to hand signals. ;)

Anyway, I really don't like the walkie talkie setups, with a cable to a headset. What a contraption for such a minor need.

Is anyone aware of a self contained headset, with no wires to a separate radio? I might consider it, but still think this could be a bad idea.
My (much) better half and I have been using "Marriage Saver" wireless headsets from "Cruising Solutions" for many years and find them most useful. In our case, I explain planned maneuvers in advance and then have her at the helm as it makes no sense to me to have a woman attempting to wrestle with a mooring line/chain/anchor while her boyfriend/husband stands at the helm issuing instructions but completely unable to see what's really going on. In our case we "dry run" the maneuver with me standing next to her at the helm and then I go forward and we repeat. I can easily tell her what she needs do (speed-up, slow, come right/left etc.) which she is quite capable of doing while I do the heavy work. We also use this method when coming into our slip and it works well and is 99% of the time without excitement (just do everything slowly). Our headsets were quite inexpensive, around $60 USD. I imagine they are more costly now but remain a good investment.

FWIW...
 

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I'll add my vote for the Marriage Saver from Cruising Solutions. We've used them when anchoring and retrieving the anchor for the last 6 or 7 years and they are great! They are so inexpensive that we carry a spare pair.
 

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Marriage Saver headsets by Cruising Solutions.

Working fantastic for us with over 2 years full time cruising. One of our best purchases.
Haha, oh you were serious! At first I thought that was a joke hhahaha! That is rich.. Cool though!

Sent from my HTC6500LVW using Tapatalk
 

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Mini, you know your supposed to reverse the rolls. You on the bow, she drives.

Sometimes it's hard to talk the significant other into this, once you convince her, it works wonders.

That said, this transition was easier for moorings and anchor, than approaching a dock. Took a lot more "taukin" to convince her of that one, and sometimes in a tight spot, she still says no.

Hand signals have become so sophisticated, I think at this point I can tell her what bottle of wine to open when we get settled from the bow without saying a word :)
 

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We have been using headsets for over 10 years. We got the idea originally while trying to pick up mooring balls in the BVI. We are now devoted users of them. We also started using them for setting the chute while just the two of us are on the boat, works extremely well for that also.

Although we moved on from the bulky "Marriage Savers" to very cool low profile Sena BlueTooth headsets. The original Marriage Savers were huge. The downside of the new technology ones are the cost, $$$$. BlueTooth works incredibly well, crisp as if you are standing right next to each other. Really top notch. Sena product were originally built for motorcycles so we never have wind noise issues. Zero RF interference issues which can be an issue with Marriage Savers.

LOVE THESE!!!! (these also come with two boom mics, we prefer a very tiny boom mic option)
 

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I think the ones we have are the marriage savers. Whatever they are they definitely make life more agreeable for us when we're working opposite ends of the boat. When we don't use them, I have the worst time hearing the Capt and it goes all downhill from there. Best Christmas present he ever gave me.
 

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BTW, the Marriage Savers and Sena solutions are full duplex solutions, no VOX issues to deal with. VOX would be a nightmare in the wind.
 

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...it makes no sense to me to have a woman attempting to wrestle with a mooring line/chain/anchor while her boyfriend/husband stands at the helm...
THIS!

It's not discrimination, sexism, or any other kind of bias. It's just a plain fact of human physiology that, in general, men have greater upper-body strength than woman (obviously there are exceptions, but they are just that--exceptions). Given that, I have never understood why the "usual" way that most couples seem to do things like anchoring, mooring, or docking is to have the man standing at the helm, doing the job that requires the very least amount of physical effort, while the woman does all the heavy lifting and hard work.

Definitely makes no sense at all.
 

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We have the marriage saver headsets. Bought them at the Annapolis Boat Show two years ago for $75 or so. They work well. They are sensitive, so one needs to move the mike just a bot away from one's lips or the mike picks up one's breathing in and out. They have two levels of volume control. We use them for anchoring on our 46 Moody. Even though the boat is a center cockpit, the foredeck crew is too far away to hear commands from the helm or to relay information back to the skipper. Recommended.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thank for the recommendations. I will check them out. Ironically, I'm more concerned they will cause more trouble than they solve. Hand signals work fine, expect for those few occasions when you have no hands left and need to signal something. I'm more worried that something like a critical "what are you doing?" is going to come from either of us at any time and cause more grief than the simplicity of a hand signal allows.

I should have seen the sexist accusations coming. I think it was actually sexist for any of you to make any assumptions. We've both done the bow work. The issue wouldn't matter either way. However, my wife is not as comfortable maneuvering our 54 footer, where you lose sight of the ball 15 to 20 feet away. She has sailed for a sum total of 5 years, I've been at it for 40. How many are all over a 50+ footer in their first five years afloat?

As for needing upper body strength to grab a mooring or drop an anchor, particularly with an electric windlass, you must be doing it wrong. If done properly, neither require any strength to speak of. You just need to position the boat properly and hold it there.

Thanks again for the above recommendations. I still think this could go badly.
 

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Thanks again for the above recommendations. I still think this could go badly.
Nah, it will be fine. They have been a huge impact on stress reduction. Go gold plated and get the Sena's, they are worth every penny. I think they are likely the best investment for the enjoyment of a cruising couple.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Nah, it will be fine. They have been a huge impact on stress reduction. Go gold plated and get the Sena's, they are worth every penny. I think they are likely the best investment for the enjoyment of a cruising couple.
Thanks. Just ordered them on Amazon Prime. We can play in the living room for another month. Hopefully, we all play nicely. :)
 

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Let me know if you need any help. I also use them at work for team's doing inventories of Datacenters. They work in the harshest of environments.
 

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Thanks again for the above recommendations. I still think this could go badly.
I don't know about badly, but I agree with you that headsets are a solution in search of a problem. Hand signals work much better for my wife and I (and we too perform both deck and helm duties interchangeably). We used headsets for a number of years, but almost naturally slid into using hand signals. Have been doing so for the past six or seven years. For us, it's just easier, clearer, and more efficient.

BTW, hand signals still offer plenty of options when it comes to giving the "what are you doing!" expression ;).
 

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Discussion Starter #18
.....BTW, hand signals still offer plenty of options when it comes to giving the "what are you doing!" expression ;).
But you can't see them with your back turned. These mics are always live. :)
 

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I don't know about badly, but I agree with you that headsets are a solution in search of a problem. Hand signals work much better for my wife and I (and we too perform both deck and helm duties interchangeably). We used headsets for a number of years, but almost naturally slid into using hand signals. Have been doing so for the past six or seven years. For us, it's just easier, clearer, and more efficient.

BTW, hand signals still offer plenty of options when it comes to giving the "what are you doing!" expression ;).
Yup, the thing I've always wondered about these "Marriage Savers", does their use really change what you're actually saying to your partner? Does the tone, or potential sense of urgency or panic simply vanish from your communication, or it simply the VOLUME that's toned down? Or, that your 'yelling' is simply kept private? :)

Moreover, do people on 40-footers actually bother with these things when coming into a DESERTED anchorage, when there's nobody else within earshot? :)

Guess I've watched way too many crew on 150-footers using these things, whenever I see a Mom & Pop on an IP 38 coming alongside a dock wearing headsets, sorry - but it always strikes me as just a BIT of overkill... :)


 

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Discussion Starter #20
.....whenever I see a Mom & Pop on an IP 38 coming alongside a dock wearing headsets, sorry - but it always strikes me as just a BIT of overkill... :)
I also think they look unprofessional on a sailboat, where we can see each other. 90% of the time, they serve no purpose and may just be a way for an amateur crew to compensate.

It's only the few, as I mentioned, when they might be useful: the bow is drifting away, the helmsman can't see it, the mooring line is running taught and the foredeck has no free hands for a signal. As I think about it, we occasionally over run the ball as well, which doesn't do the topside paint any good. While that allows plenty of time to tie off, a quick signal for a burst in reverse would be nice too, but the foredeck is busy tying off.

But, I guess we're going to give the a try. I give even money that one pair goes to the bottom of an anchorage along the way. :)
 
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