SailNet Community banner

1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,006 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Do you have to use the special marine terminals with heat shrink on them, or can you use a normal terminal and put your own heat shrink over the terminal ? The reason I ask is I have a few terminals that I'd rather not do over if I can just heat shrink over them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
795 Posts
Excellent link Brian,

In crucial areas around heads etc I use both quality connectors shrink them and then quality shrink wrap. The key is quality products and professional level crimpers as shown in the pictures.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,324 Posts
Unless you can detach the wire from the other end and slide it on, you typically can't get the proper size shrink tube over a previously installed connector.
 

·
Asleep at the wheel
Joined
·
3,017 Posts
From the question, I assumed that the OP was installing the connectors himself, in which case he should be able to put the shrink tube over the wire, then attach the connector for a good fit.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,764 Posts
If you want to use your own terminals and then heat shrink over them then you'll want to use uninsulated terminals with the correct crimp tool. This is a a different tool from an insulated crimper.....

The crimp dies are different depending upon who's uninsulated terminals you use:


It makes a different style crimp with a bare terminal..


Even when you put heat shrink over it the water tight integrity is usually not as good as a factory made terminal...
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,764 Posts
Can you explain that last part? I probably just am not familiar enough with the factory made heat shrink terminals.
Sealing the exposed wire end becomes difficult when it shrinks. Factory made terminals are made in a jig that creates a seal around the metal part of the terminal and limits "pull away" from the metal part of the terminal..


Good quality factory made terminals rarely pull away during shrinking (maybe 1 in 150) like making your own can lead to... When I see "home made" heat shrink terminals approx six out of ten have a gap between the terminal and the shrink.... Most owners don't even notice but the reality is that approx six out of ten of them are no better than a standard terminal yet the owner spent a lot more time making them...

This is an exaggerated example but shows the gap that is often created when making home made heat shrinks.


Not saying home made HS can't be done, it certainly can, but the repeatability and time it takes to make them correctly is more tedious than a factory made terminal and requires an additional set of terminals and crimpers...
 

·
Asleep at the wheel
Joined
·
3,017 Posts
Thanks! That's what I wasn't envisioning. In my mind the shrink was just on the wire-end. Makes more sense.

For the DIY'er, who isn't doing hundreds or thousands of these, I wonder if a really narrow bead of something like tefgel or 5200 at the end of the heat shrink might work. Of course, you'd have to be careful not to let it get onto the wire...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
625 Posts
What are all your thoughts on using liquid electrical tape? Water tight, air tight and conforms to anything. Couple of coats and good to go. Also, can be removed relatively easy. And come in colors. I use it on everything.

I even use it over terminal blocks after connection is screwed down, over the screw and all...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
625 Posts
You can also buy heat shrink with sealer inside. I have used 100% silicone on wire first and slide heat shrink over that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
870 Posts
I'm convinced, I am going to get some marine terminals. :)

MaineSail does it again.
They're expensive but west marine and other locations do sell them in small quantities. You pay over $1 each but oh well, that's how it goes with boats.

McMaster also sells heat shrink terminals in a good range of sizes for a decent price - although I like Ancor brand the best.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,184 Posts
I've seen some pictures of good crimps cross-sectioned, and the copper wire has cold flowed and completely filled the space.

So my question is, why do you need heat shrink on good crimps, given the above? What are we trying to keep water out of?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,324 Posts
From the question, I assumed that the OP was installing the connectors himself, in which case he should be able to put the shrink tube over the wire, then attach the connector for a good fit.
Sounded to me like the connector was already installed and they didn't want to cut it off. If the other end of the wire is coming out of a device, it may not be accessible, but I couldn't tell.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
What are all your thoughts on using liquid electrical tape? Water tight, air tight and conforms to anything. Couple of coats and good to go. Also, can be removed relatively easy. And come in colors. I use it on everything.

I even use it over terminal blocks after connection is screwed down, over the screw and all...
For what it's worth here are my two cents.

Firstly, i am having a ton of challenges with the wiring connections made on my boat. Most only date 8 years, but there are many that are corroded severely. You simply can't understate the importance of electrical connections in a marine environment.

I work with high school students in underwater remote operated vehicle competitions. There, our practice is to a) solder where possible, b) shrink tube, c) cover the shrink tube With liquid electrical tape.

Perhaps that's overkill , but that's the approach I have takes as I am slowing replacing electrical connections on my boat.




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
  • Like
Reactions: Delta-T

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,857 Posts
You can also buy heat shrink with sealer inside. I have used 100% silicone on wire first and slide heat shrink over that.
The heat shrink connectors that Maine pictured have adhesive inside. If you are buying heat shrink by itself the ONLY kind to buy is the type with adhesive inside. Without there is not a watertight seal.

I have come across some old connectors without the adhesive and the corrosion inside is often as bad or worse than without any heat shrink.

I wouldn't use silicone or TefGel or 5200.
 

·
Mermaid Hunter
Joined
·
5,689 Posts
So my question is, why do you need heat shrink on good crimps, given the above? What are we trying to keep water out of?
To keep water out of the joint that might otherwise wick between the insulation and the wire leading to corrosion and failure.

I work with high school students in underwater remote operated vehicle competitions. There, our practice is to a) solder where possible, b) shrink tube, c) cover the shrink tube With liquid electrical tape.
I've been doing electrical work for a long time and at one time was NASA-certified for soldering. NASA moved to crimps and wraps a long time ago because the numbers made it clear that they were more robust. Granted they don't have the corrosion problems we do at sea, but for me if it's good enough to put on orbit it's good enough for me. Crimp.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,033 Posts
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top