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I shot this video yesterday, and it that shows how a heave to at high speed is done..as seen from the outside..thought you may benefit of this..

this manouver is particularly imortant to know and know how to execute in case of a MOB situation, while sailing upwind at high speeds..

With this manouver, if done rapidly I can heave to and end up picking up the MOB almost within an arm's lenght of by side or stern...

Please practice it, and if you have any questions just ask...

Basically it consists of a tack without tacking the genoa, to windward, locking the rudder fast and setting the main, rapidly at its best heave to position.

The boat stops moving immediately and will slowly drifts back to where it was coming from...

Please enjoy and try it out..one never knows....

The video shows how fast the manouver can be done, and how rapidly it stops...

The "hand brake" of the seas...

 

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Telstar 28
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Of course, that only works if you're going upwind at the time of the MOB incident... if you're going downwind or on a reach, you'll have to do something a bit different. ;)
 

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Your destination is *always* upwind, so you *always* beat. <grin>

I've used the quick-stop approach to MOB recovery (which amounts to a heave-to when starting upwind) with an asymmetric spinnaker up flying off a bowsprit with success. I haven't tried it using the pole yet. Frankly, it makes me nervous. Could be expensive.
 

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Real gentlemen never sail to windward... :)
Your destination is *always* upwind, so you *always* beat. <grin>

I've used the quick-stop approach to MOB recovery (which amounts to a heave-to when starting upwind) with an asymmetric spinnaker up flying off a bowsprit with success. I haven't tried it using the pole yet. Frankly, it makes me nervous. Could be expensive.
That describes most of sailing... :)

</grin>
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Of course, that only works if you're going upwind at the time of the MOB incident... if you're going downwind or on a reach, you'll have to do something a bit different. ;)
Crazy Dog...my mother used to say:

"If you have nothing good to say..better say nothing"...or something like that...


This because, as you can see in my quote from the second paragraph of my introductory post, I say:

"this manouver is particularly imortant to know and know how to execute in case of a MOB situation, while sailing upwind at high speeds.."

you blind bastardo sujo.....no bone for you tonight!
 

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Of course, that only works if you're going upwind at the time of the MOB incident... if you're going downwind or on a reach, you'll have to do something a bit different. ;)
You know, modern mono hull sloops can also sail upwind unlike old square riggers or modern katamarans :)

Alex, I understand the breaking moment, I have more trouble beating at 8 knots? :mad: :mad: :mad:
 

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Giu, After seeing your "heave to" video I practiced it several times to acquire it as a natural instinct. Now I heave to if I want to have a meal, take a nap, etc. Precisely last summer I practiced it as a MOB recovery manoeuvre: threw a lifesaver ring overboard and hove to. It is amazing how close you stay to the "MOB" no matter in what sea condition. It definitely gives me a much higher feeling of safety for the people onboard knowing that if they ever fall OB I'll be there with them in a minute.

And whenever I sail with someone I teach the trick to him or her (just in case I happen to play the roll of the lifesaver one day).
 

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Eclipse participated in a Safety at Sea Seminar for junior sailors sponsored by the Storm Trysail Club. After a "chalk-talk", we took the juniors took the boat out to see what would happen in "Quick-stop" maneuvers. As Giu says, tacking the boat without freeing the genoa sheet essetially stops the boat from moving away from the victim, and allows you to almost pivot in place. Going upwind in a 12-15 knot breeze, I tossed over a cushion, and on our first try we were back to it within 45 seconds. We fly a symetrical chute, with a pole. The procedure is to tack, all standing, and sort out the mess afterwards. That is what we did. It works equally well. We had no damage to the 3/4oz spinnaker. We must have made a half dozen practice runs. Our times improved from the original 45 seconds. The main problem was that the different juniors steering the boat were dinghy sailors. They were unused to the momentum of a 10 ton keelboat, and would return to the "victim" at 6 or 7 knots, not realizing that they wouldn't be able to slow down as fast as they wanted to when it was time to pick up the "MOB". Grabbing someone at that speed could break limbs or pull others overboard too. This seminar was a real eye-opener for me.
 

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The videos on heaving-to remind all sailors to practice this usful maneuver. I would like to see more vidios sent in to help stimulate discussion on techniques.

I hove-to many times on my solo circumnavigation. Through trial and error, I learned a few tricks that others may want to try when they have sea room on a reasonably calm day.

Check out the second video on Guilietta's above thread.

The lady helmsperson comes about in smart fashion and leaves the jib on starboard so as to backwind it. At the same time, one of the crew lets the main all the way out to port. But then, as you listen to the conversation...something isn't quite right..."We're still moving."

Here is what I found on my Hans Christian to solve that problem. Before tacking over to port, I hauled in on the starboard jib sheet as far as possible because I wanted to keep all of the jib on the starboard side of the mast when I came about. Notice in the video, when they tacked, that a good part of the jib (even though sheeted to starboard), bellies out to port of the mast.This causes one of the problems. The jib is still giving some lift and thus still pushes the boat slowly forward. What we want is no forward motion.

In my own case, looking at the video, I would also not have touched the main when I first tacked to port. Instead I would have headed back up to starboard, toward the eye of the wind.My goal is to slow the boat to almost a stop. Careful not to tack back thru the eye of the wind, I work the bow up to the eye and then back to port several times until I almost put the boat in irons. Allowing the bow to head slightly to port, I then adjust the main inorder to find a balance between the flattened jib tacked down on the starboard rail (wanting to push the bow to port) while I counteract that force by adjusting the main to create enough weather helm so as to push the bow to starboard.

If I get it right, the boat stays put as if anchored at an angle of about 45 degrees off the wind, drifting down wind when its blowing a gale or crabbing slowly forward in light air.

Try it ...you'll like it.
 

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Very nice video. Thanks for the demonstration of a quick-stop heaving-to.

I, for one, appreciate the effort and time you take to make these videos. It is very valuable for a relatively inexperienced sailor like myself to see examples of how others do even some of the basic maneuvers. I can't wait to get out and try this technique to see how far way from a MOB I end up (unfortunately, for those of us on the Great Lakes, it will be at least 4-5 months:()

Keep the videos coming, and thanks again.
 

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We fly a symetrical chute, with a pole. The procedure is to tack, all standing, and sort out the mess afterwards. That is what we did. It works equally well. We had no damage to the 3/4oz spinnaker.
Wait a minute! You heave to with the symetrical spinnaker poled up? And you say the procedure is the same as with the jib? Wow! I'm looking forward to a sailing day with some 5 or 6 kt wind to try it...
 

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I'd love to see the video, but when I CLICK HERE NOW I get some wierd Portuguese werewolf site. What gives?
 

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Hesper-

Click on this video:

 

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There is a technique for heaving-to in MOB.

1) Heave-to as soon as MOB is noted.

2) Beam reach a little until MOB is abeam of helm

3) WITH SAILS SHEETED IN, sail downwind until MOB is off the quarter

4) Head up onto a close haul / close reach until MOB is off the quarter

5) Heave-to again, use a shroud as a guide to drift down to MOB.

Different boats respond differently; e.g., self-tacking jibs may not heave-to. Practice is the key.

One person can do this and be able to snag the MOB on the leeward side. In addition, you never lose sight of the MOB.

If you are doing a MOB from a beam reach or broad reach, sail back so you can heave-to.

One criticism is that the boat will drift into the MOB causing an injury. In my experience the water being pushed by the boat going to leeward will keep the MOB away from the hull.

Try it - you might like it.

Jack
 

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Giu's use of the term "heaving to" is perhaps not apt in a MOB scenario. What we did with the spinnaker up is called a "Quickstop" maneuver. The main idea with a Quickstop is to keep the boat close to the MOB, slow it down, and get the boat back to the victim as soon as possible. The main idea with heaving to is to put the boat on a better angle and speed to the wind and waves so as to put up with bad weather over a long time. I would not want to "heave to" with a spinnaker up, but would be happy to tack with one up (as we did, several times) if it meant picking up a victim sooner.
 

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There are lots of ways to skin cats

There is a technique for heaving-to in MOB.

1) Heave-to as soon as MOB is noted.

2) Beam reach a little until MOB is abeam of helm

3) WITH SAILS SHEETED IN, sail downwind until MOB is off the quarter

4) Head up onto a close haul / close reach until MOB is off the quarter

5) Heave-to again, use a shroud as a guide to drift down to MOB.

Different boats respond differently; e.g., self-tacking jibs may not heave-to. Practice is the key.

One person can do this and be able to snag the MOB on the leeward side. In addition, you never lose sight of the MOB.

If you are doing a MOB from a beam reach or broad reach, sail back so you can heave-to.

One criticism is that the boat will drift into the MOB causing an injury. In my experience the water being pushed by the boat going to leeward will keep the MOB away from the hull.

Try it - you might like it.

Jack
One reason the "Quickstop" was developed was because people who go off on a reach until the MOB is abeam, then sail downwind with the sails pulled in, then go to close-hauled, and then heave-to are so busy checking through the steps and the procedures that they lose sight of the MOB. If the directive is simply to tack - no matter what- it keeps you closer to the victim and slows you down. Both these things help make recovery of the victim quicker and more certain. Someone trying to do a quickstop may end up going through the reaching/downwind/upwind/heave-to scenario, but doesn't have to. While the reach/return system may work, keeping it simple may work better.
 

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One reason the "Quickstop" was developed was because people who go off on a reach until the MOB is abeam, then sail downwind with the sails pulled in, then go to close-hauled, and then heave-to are so busy checking through the steps and the procedures that they lose sight of the MOB. If the directive is simply to tack - no matter what- it keeps you closer to the victim and slows you down. Both these things help make recovery of the victim quicker and more certain. Someone trying to do a quickstop may end up going through the reaching/downwind/upwind/heave-to scenario, but doesn't have to. While the reach/return system may work, keeping it simple may work better.
I have done the heave-to method with hundreds of students over the past 12years. The issue you raise has never been a problem.

Heaving-to really slows the boat down and the MOB is always on the same side of the boat and close in, hence we never lose sight. When you have to tack, the MOB will disappear behind the bow and foresail. In addition, tacking while single handed after an MOB is no easy task. The heave-to method simply involves sailing around the MOB.

Jack
 
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