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Discussion Starter #1
Seeing a fair amount of interest in the topic in different threads over the last few weeks, I'd like to invite you experienced folk to share your knowledge to help us noobs learn the tricks of the trade. Thanks for your help.

For noobs, I found this as a starting point:

Heaving-To

Copy-and-paste the line below into the Google search window to get a list of sailnet threads mentioning heaving-to:

"heaving to" /site:http://www.sailnet.com/forums/
 

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all boats are different is my advice and after that test your boat with different techniques...

take some pics if your heaving to

my first heaving to experience(on an h28 full keel 1945 boat) we took advantage of how well the boat did it in the middle of san francisco bay and decided to have lunch the motion was so nice...

cheers
 

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As mentioned above; you are going to have to experiment on your boat. Originally used on full keel boats, the fin keel and cutaway keel boats may not heave to as advertised.
Being hove to, or not making way through the water, does not alleviate you of the responsibility to keep a good look out. It is not an excuse to go below and sleep, and leave your fortune to fate, or to some watchstander, asleep on the bridge of his vessel.
 
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As mentioned above; you are going to have to experiment on your boat. Originally used on full keel boats, the fin keel and cutaway keel boats may not heave to as advertised.
There is a lot more than keel shape that matters. My friend's Pacific Seacraft Orion (which has a cutaway forward full keel) lies hove-to most nicely on main only.

My Pearson will lie hove-to on main only or with some jib. However it continues to fore reach at about 1-2 knots with jib out.

The boats (full keel, but small day sailors) that I teach on have a fractional rig with a small jib. They hove-to very nicely with both sails, but you do need to trim the jib quite tightly for it to work or they fore reach as well.

You will need to experiment and find out what works well on your boat.
 

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The only difference in heaving to with a fin is bringing the boat to a full stop before letting the bow swing down wind and putting the helm up. If the boat isn't stopped it will just keep fore reaching. You can usually balance the sails by adjusting the main, if the bow wants to come up you need to depower the main. We used to heave to in all sorts of small dinghies between races, I've never sailed a boat that won't heave to.
I don't understand how you could heave to with a single sail without fore reaching, it's the balance of jib against rudder and main.
 

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yeah I will tend to agree with the above...dinghy sailing is where you learn this and can really see how much you are moving...

I kind of dont understand the whole NON foresail heaving to since in essence its the backing up of the jib or foresail which leaves the bow in a standstill...but again modern boats especially the really new ones with canting keels twin rudders, etc...I have no experience in..soooo

having said that you can only learn by trying out....ON YOUR BOAT or a sistership

notice I said have "lunch" thats sailor talk for keeping a lookout and eating saltine crackers! jajajaja

peace guys

ps. on full keelers the angle of the backed up jib should be parallel to the angle of the tiller...assuming you have a tiller. and main or mizzen or whatever for the most part depowered or midships...what I always did was simply lower main completelt and the mizzen sometimes helped with steading the motion of the waves...

kind of like a small anchor sail in rolly anchorages...
 

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I don't understand how you could heave to with a single sail without fore reaching, it's the balance of jib against rudder and main.
I've found in winds in the 30's to 40 knot range, my boat will heave to under deeply reefed main alone(I have a yawl which could put my CE forward a bit). Windage forward of the main, mostly from the furled genoa, is enough to keep the bow at about 45 degrees to the wind and waves with the main sheeted tight on the centerline.

However, if I lock the rudder to windward(standard heaving-to position), she may tack. So the wheel is adjusted so the boat settles, hove-to, occasionally fore-reaching for a bit, then settling.

I needed to do the above this past season when my daughter and I had to get some rest from 35 to 40 knot winds on an overnight(we were spent).

The reason I tried this was to keep the bow pointed well forward into the good sized seas with breaking crests, as opposed to beam to, which it will tend to do, hove-to, in higher and higher gusts, if there is even a little jib on the headstay.

We avoided any yawing of gusts pushing the bow down wind(boat broadside to wind/waves) which would have been a much, much wetter and rougher ride.


In lighter conditions, I need the jib(or a good portion unfurled), back winded. Or in lighter-moderate conditions, I'll just heave-to with mizzen alone-sheeted centerline, and rudder locked to windward. The boat rides in a nice slick but it's mostly broadside to wind and waves. Not a good thing in heavier wind and seas.
 

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...Windage forward of the main, mostly from the furled genoa, is enough to keep the bow at about 45 degrees to the wind and waves with the main sheeted tight on the centerline.
This is absolutely right. My previous boat behaved the same, hove-to with just the main, 'cause it had high freeboard forward, and I have spent up to 3 days waiting for favorable winds on the way to the Azores.

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The reason I tried this was to keep the bow pointed well forward into the good sized seas with breaking crests, as opposed to beam to, which it will tend to do, hove-to, in higher and higher gusts, if there is even a little jib on the headstay....
The advantage of being hove-to is that the boat creates a slick to windward, and while the seas are confused sometimes breaking all around, it is somewhat smooth in the slick, softening the motion. This is why it is important to keep forward motion (foreaching) to a minimum, it is impossible to stop it at all.
 

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you can also pour oil too...its a bit messy though....jajaja
 

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never found any need to heave to inmy boat or when sailing secvere electrical stormsin gom. we just sailed thru. ws wicked but it was also great experience.
my boat so far--no problem with 60 plus kt winds. i do not sail in furycames or tropical storms. i have yet to find a rationale for me to heave to..mebbe if i was exhausted, but so far i have had helpers.
i have gone into irons to boat a fishie. i have put my boat and others into irons for various reasons..including teaching an ******* to behave..lol..was his boat and he couldnt sail it. so we sat until he went nutz then i sailed out of it. took his non-learning butt home to his place and never saw again.
 

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I don't understand how you could heave to with a single sail without fore reaching, it's the balance of jib against rudder and main.
You can also balance the rudder against the main without the jib and heave-to.
 

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In our current boat the best combination I've come up with is a fully furled genoa, full staysail and reefed main. This works well in 15-20 knots, haven't tried it in anything stronger. I think if I double reefed the main with the staysail she would hove to in stronger winds, each boat is different. Our boat has a long fin and skeg hung rudder and is a cutter rigged sloop.
 

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OK. I am motivated. I need to heave-to more! I am going to make a list in my log book. It will start with 5 kt, and go up to 35 kt by 5 kt increments. I am going to try to heave-to in as many conditions as possible next season, making note of what configuration worked.
 

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It is one of the first things that I like to play with on an unknown boat. It is useful to know and is helping me get a better understanding of how to heave-to as well.

I'm going out in my boat tomorrow and want to try to see if I can get it to heave-to without fore reaching.
 

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Just a quick note, if the boat is for-reaching you are not hove to you are sailing very poorly. As a storm tactic for-reaching defeats the whole point of being hove to. Main only, my full keeler will heave to very nicely.
 

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It is my understanding when heaving to ...there is some forward motion. The idea is to limit this motion as much as possible to remain in the slick produced, however, I don't think it's possible to completely eliminate it.
 

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I have a full keel with a cutaway forefoot and when I "heave to" I tack and back wind the yankee, lock the wheel to steer upwind and adjust the main. No matter what I try I am close to being beam on to the wind whereas I want to be around 50 degrees from the wind. Because of the cutaway forefoot I can probably get closer to the wind with the main only with the rudder over hard and not worry about tacking through. I single hand a lot and heaving to is what I use when putting a reef in the main.
 

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It might be more effective to just spill the air from the main and keep the boat sailing under jib alone. I find most boats with a cutaway forefoot wont heave to.
 

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It might be more effective to just spill the air from the main and keep the boat sailing under jib alone. I find most boats with a cutaway forefoot wont heave to.
Heaving to works better for me with the stay sail and a deep reefed main, either the 2nd or 3rd reef, depending on wind and wave action. Adjustments to both rudder and mainsail to keep from fore reaching.
 
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