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Crealock 37
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676 Posts
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My boat is a 36' fractional rigged sloop. The headsail is a 100% self-tacking jib.

Having never hove to before we gave it a try last Monday when lunch time rolled around. Winds were 15-17 knots. I used the traveler stop on the self-tacker to hold the jib backed and put the rudder full over to windward. With the main sheeted in the boat would set at about 30-50 degrees off the wind, heading up and falling off as the jib and rudder did their job. With the main eased out the boat set at about 70 degrees off the wind. Boat speed according to the knot-meter was about 1.5 knots with the GPS showing 2 - 2.5 knots. From watching the shoreline I did see a great deal of leeway.

Is that speed normal for being hove to?

Would a preventer to hold the main in position to provide a more stable weathercock be prudent?

Having read about sailing for many years, doing the ASA "Idiot to Titanic Captain in 6 days" course and some limited chartering I'm finally getting to put some of this "knowledge" to use and I'm having a blast!!
 

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As a general rule, if you have boatspeed (forward) you're not hove to--you're forereaching. Your only motion should be sideways, and it could easily be a knot or two. A little work on trimming her to head up a bit more should pay off, perhaps by reducing the size of the jib, a little less backing of the jib, or sheeting the main in a bit more.

It sounds like you're real close.
 

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Telstar 28
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992 Posts
sounds like you had a bit of current.
 

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Dale...
Please confirm "...rudder full over to windward."
We also have a self tending (Hoyt) jib boom and must put the rudder full over to leeward.
Thanks,
Paul
You guys need to be clear whether you're talking about the rudder or the tiller...:confused: .;) :)
 
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