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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I remain confused about how to trim the main in heavy air. I''m talking gross trim here, not little tugs on the outhaul or the cunningham.

I am a cruiser, not a racer. I want to get where I''m going without dumping the contents of the galley lockers on the cabin floor, or losing my crew/wife in a mutiny.

Let''s say I''m properly reefed in 20-25 knots, sailing above a beam reach. How should the sheet and traveller be set up? Why? What should I look for in the shape of the sail?

Thanks!

Paul
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Exactly the source of my confusion.

I''ve often heard/read to flatten the sails in heavy air. That means traveller down, leech tight, backstay tight (if you have one--I don''t).

I''ve also heard/read to spill air by twisting the main. To me, that means a looser leech, traveller high and sheet eased.

I''m getting it sorted out now. In my original scenario I''m reefed, so Bob''s advice is correct. But spilling air out of the upper leech is available as a depowering tactic short of reefing.

Thanks to you both. By the way, "Escape Artist" is a Hunter 336.

Paul
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Re: "release the topping lift"

No kidding. One day I was slogging along to windward and looking up puzzled at my sloppy, open leech--even though the main was sheeted in hard.

Sure enough, the topping lift was up tight.

Now I watch for it, and I see boats on the water with an overtight topping lift all the time. I''m shopping for a solid vang right now, it''s the only way to go with these huge roaches.
 
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