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Alaskan Family
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone-
We are a young family in Alaska. I have been reading forums here on Sailnet for sometime now. I never felt that I needed to sign up becouse most of my questions about sailing have already been answered in previous posts, but the time has come to start chasing the cruising dream. My wife and I have put in place a goal to purchase a catamaran and take to the seas with our two children. Our family members think that we are crazy, that the worst situations possible lie in our path, and we should bag the idea. It is so hard to chase your dream with so many "Nay" sayers.
Im interested in the stories of other full time cruisers. How did you achieve your goals? How did you save for the financial journey? How did you choose your vessel, and was it a good choice? I want to hear the image in your mind at the worst hurdle you had to overcome to become a confident cruiser with others opinions of doom and gloom?

Whats your "getting started" story?

Thanks all - AKTORMEY
 

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Wandering Aimlessly
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22,037 Posts
Don't get a lot of sailors from the 'once and future capital of Alaska". Welcome aboard.

First question, do you have any experience, as a family, spending time aboard a boat? If not, ya might want to try chartering something similar to what you want to live on to get a better idea of what you're dealing with on a practical level.

Beyond that though, the only real hurdle you face is financial. If you're not independently wealthy, then you need to have, or develop skills that you can use to support yourself where ever you intend to go.
 

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I defiantly know the walls you are running into.

I have lived the American Life Style for the past 60 years. Grew up in an all American town, Served my country (USAF), went to war (Vietnam), came home and married the girl next door (well 10 miles from home), did everything the way it was ordained in the Norman Rockwell painting. Did OK, too. Ended up in California when my wife of 40 years passed way from cancer.

Now I don't want the house, the toys, the job. Sold the house, the toys, quit the job. Bought a boat.. I leave the job Friday, the house closes the 15th, the boat is mine on the 20th, it will splash before the 1st.

Most of my family are really OK with this. One of my brothers (The Ex-Coast Guard Officer) wants to go with me. I will never lack for a crew up and down the East Coast.

But according to everyone else: "Your are nuts, don't you know there are Hurricanes?", "You're going to live on a boat? Where will you sleep?", "Of course you'll go to hotels or families houses when you're in port (bit of a nautical term there), right?" When I say ,no, I'll live on the boat. They still don't understand that I mean forever. I have to tell them that I would rather live at the dock, without ever going to sea again, then live in a house. They still don't understand.
 

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Congratulations to both of you. Living the dream is everything. In 40 or 50 years you won't be able to put on your own slippers so gitater Each to their own but let me recommend the summer cruising on the mid BC coast before it's too late. Winter moorage is cheaply available while you kick back in a warmer clime or just sail away to follow your dream.
 
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