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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Great site! I am at the final step (subj to survey) in owning a Vancouver 27. Her name is "Spirt of Cutty Sark" named after the famous clipper Cutty Sark of 1869. My plans are to trailer her. I will need a trailer and a method to lower the mast, any suggestions would help. My question; The original owner, a lawyer, lived in Nanaimo, BC, Canada. Why would he have her registered in London England. The Boat was built in BC by Trade Winds. Was it because the famous Cutty Sark was registered in London, or is there a more practical reason. The original owner has passed away and I may approach the family later. Assuming the boat becomes mine I would not change names but I question having "London" on the stern vs my home.
city/port? Gary, Prince George, BC, Canada
Never been to England
Gary
 

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Does the boat have a 'K' number? If so, it's not really 'registered' and he probably just put that on the stern - was he an expat Brit?

Welcome from another BC'er.

Are you taking the boat inland? to sail it where? It's on the heavy side for trailering yourself; you'll need a pretty good tow vehicle. Getting the mast down will involve some sort of crane or derrick - possibly alongside a dock with the right tide.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
In my research the original owner said it was British registered, there are no K # on the hull. However I just came across this:
[B]What are the benefits of registration and licensing[/B]?
In addition to the obvious title advantages of registration, a Certificate of Canadian or British Registry is the most respected identification in the world for a vessel if you plan to sail abroad. Additionally, it is easier to sell a registered vessel since title and legal encumbrances may be determined from the Ship's Registry alone and one need not look further. A registered vessel is considered better collateral than a licenced vessel, since title has been established and legal encumbrances must be registered on the Ship's Register.
I am 1 day from Prince Rupert or Vancouver and I want to trailer it warmer climates in the winter. I figure a 10,000 lbs trailer with 3/4 or 1T should do it? Have been looking at used trailers but they are pretty high up for self launch. Some new trailers have drop axle hubs that can put the keel 9" off the ground but cost.
Gary
 

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According to Sailboatdata this boat weighs around 9000# dry.. so a trailering weight will be all of that 10000# or more and that leaves little in reserve. I do think a 1T truck will be fine, but finding a suitable trailer will be lucky, or pricey, or both.

Do you plan to keep it in George and make summer trips to the coast as well as longer southbound trips? This is not a boat that most people would consider 'trailerable' or typically ramp launchable so you've got your work cut out for you.

If the purchase goes through, leave it here on the south coast for your first summer, at least!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I agree a 12000 lb trailer would be better. Hopeful thinking on my part that I could get by with a 10,000. The 2nd owner has not taken very good care of the boat and needs a month of care, resealing, etc. For me its best to get it home. Will let you know how I make out. Gary
 
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