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Registered
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12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i joined last night, i was surprised how helpful and welcoming everyone was .
i am just starting to attempt to get into sailing, i don't have a boat currently, i am going to sail with other people first. so far from what i read it looks daunting owning a boat, apparently from the moment you buy one stuff starts to fall off and leak constantly i hope to gain some working knowledge of how stuff works on a boat, and how to fix the problems on the fly, before i try and buy my own boat. last night i got a lot of help finding boat clubs around my area and sailing classes as well (one for 25 dollars!)the people in the general chat room were very friendly and helpful which was awesome, i always feel a little weird as the new guy, but everyone here made me feel welcome.
Since i have no boat, i guess most of my questions will be about boat stuff, thru holes, rigging,general sailing stuff , like what is gibing and why is it bad? and what happens if you have 450 feet of anchor line (rode?) and you are in 800 feet of water
 

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Bring On The Wind
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281 Posts
Green, welcome to Sailnet, this is a great place to learn and ask about sailing and all the intricacies that go with it. As far as being the new guy, we all have been that at one time and if you'll wait a couple of hours or days someone will take that honor from you. Your idea is very sound in joining a sailing club and learning from and sailing with others to figure what kind of boat will fit your needs. Good luck and keep us posted as you go along.
 

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Asleep at the wheel
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3,017 Posts
Yes, welcome aboard! It sounds like your approach to sailing is a very sane one compared to the way many of us have done it. And your impression is very accurate - the minute you buy the boat everything starts to fall apart. Thankfully, it does so at a slow enough rate, and typically the repairs require so little time, that you still get to get out and enjoy everything.

Gybing, or however you spell that word (I've seen it about six different ways), is bad because of the stress on the rigging. In a tack, your boom is typically sheeted in so that it is inside the boat (because you're typically on a reach). As you swing through the wind, the boom slips to the other side (sometimes a bit abruptly), but the swing is somewhere in the neighborhood of a 90 degree arc in many cases. On a gybe, jibe, etc., you are typically running downwind. The boom is out closer to perpendicular to the boat, and when the wind shifts, the boom swings almost 180 degrees. Almost all of the force from the wind is shoving the sail forward, too, as opposed to in a tack where only a portion of the wind's force is actually applied to the sail. This increase in force, combined with the much larger swing, can give the boom and sail a lot of momentum. When they slam into the other side, that puts significantly more strain on the rigging than in a tack. There are ways to control this so a jibe isn't so bad, but an uncontrolled jibe can do real damage to the boat.

To your question about anchoring - if you're in 800 feet, you don't anchor.
 

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Registered
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17 Posts
Hello, I am Ian from Zinc Warehouse. I just joined this forum and want to participate in the different topics about the boats. What I feel that the mismatch of boat with the requirements causes a lot more issues.
 

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sunfish?junior?
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749 Posts
Hello, You are off to a good start ! Enjoy the ride. The nice thing is you will learn something new all the time and this is pure joy.
Kind Regards, Lou
 
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