SailNet Community banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, SailNet.

I've been lurking for a little while, trying to learn. Thanks for all of the knowledge transfer.

Here's some (possibly, too much) background on me.

I have loved being near or, when possible, on the water for over thirty years (now almost 50). I have not often done much about that, though. Many years ago, when we lived near Chicago, I had a 17' Smokercraft fishing boat. I enjoyed it, though it was a bit of a pain having to travel quite a distance to put it in the water. Within a few years, it was sold. Other than that, I have no real boating experience, though I would like to learn and gain some.

The situation has now changed. The home near Chicago has been sold and we have simplified down to full-time RV living as Texas residents, though I'm still working full-time also (software developer). Texas is too hot in the summer (and most of the year), so we are in the PNW, specifically, Anacortes, WA. Since I was born in WA state, this is almost like coming home for me. We both love the area. But, it introduces a conundrum. With all of the water and all of the boating in this area, I wish to join in the fun, especially since I could be out on the water in less than half an hour after leaving our RV. The issue I'm having is trying to decide what type of boat to get.

Maybe it is telling that I'm posting this on a sailing forum. But, there are issues involved that may make sailing impractical. My wife has had both knees replaced and, though she is mobile, is not really stable. As much as I like the idea of getting a sailboat, I'm not sure if it is right boat for her. There's not much issue when she is seated. Having sufficient hand-holds may help her get around the cabin. Obviously, the degree of heeling over would be a factor. I'm just not sure how much of an issue this may be. Some testing would be prudent, though I'm not sure how to go about that. When we eventually get a boat, my wife would primarily be just along for the ride. Though she may be able to help some, I would plan to be single handed just in case.

As for our usage, I am still working on Central time. This leaves quite a bit of the afternoon available for boating. Given my full-time work schedule, most boating will be in the vicinity. However, the ability to overnight in the San Juans and a rare trip further north would be desired.

Given the ability to use it fairly frequently, I would like to keep usage costs on the lower end. That points me towards choices like a small cruiser (C-Dory?), a smaller trawler, or a sailboat. The small cruiser would be quickest for running around, though smaller inside than the other choices. The trawler and sailboat are both economical under power. The sailboat, though, would occasionally (?) have free wind power, though I would be outside in the cooler months (unless I invest in a full enclosure).

Anyway, that's me and where I'm currently at with regard to boating. It's quite the predicament. I'm in a boating paradise, but somewhat paralyzed by boat choice. Hopefully, I'll soon figure out which is our best choice for boat type. I would rather be right than right now, so I'm not in a hurry as I try to analyze the options.

Cheers!

Tim
 

·
S/V Calypso
Joined
·
246 Posts
Welcome to SailNet Tim. I'm going to suggest something here, I can't believe it is me saying this, but have you considered a catamaran? No heeling, and lots of room!

-Chris
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks, Chris. I had thought of a cat last winter, possibly a Gemini 105. Since then, we had some issues with the RV, upgraded the older fifth wheel to a newer motorhome, and that reduced the boat budget substantially. 80k might get a used C-Dory TomCat 255 (power), but I'm not sure we can get a sailing cat in decent shape for that amount.
 

·
Learning the HARD way...
Joined
·
7,834 Posts
Welcome to SailNet!

$80K can still buy a lot of boat, and do not let bad knees stop you, or her.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Should there be a good selection of cats in that range? I didn't see much on yachtworld. There were quite a few monohulls though. Maybe it depends on how old it is. Since I'm financing part of it, I worry I might be able to afford the boat, but not the repairs on an older boat. I know quality of maintenance makes a big difference. My broker friend is still steering me towards power, too, though I haven't quite given up on sail yet. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hi, all.

I just wanted to provide an update of what has happened since my last post. I have thought about many types of boats, even considering buying some. But, so far, we have not purchased.

Instead, I decided to charter some different types of boats to see what we prefer. To that end, I'm pursuing some ASA certifications and will pursue one or two RPBA certifications also. I have passed my ASA 101 and 103 already and have my 104 scheduled for mid-June. I will add the 114/Cat after that and probably the RPBA single and possibly twin. That should let us charter a wide variety of boats and build some experience and narrow down some preferences.

My 101 was split over several boats. The first was a Jeaneau 39 until, on the second day, a fried alternator and electrical fire smoke revealed an improper engine shutdown. We went back in with all electronics off and swapped to a Hunter 34. After getting out of the marina, the seawater hose came off the engine and started flooding the cabin. A press fit let us return to the marina, where it was decided to call it a day. The following Tuesday, I finished up the docking maneuvers on a Jeaneau 37. My 103 was on an Island Packet 37 and training was mostly uneventful. I'm not sure yet what my 104 will be on.

My wife's health may be improving somewhat. We are both losing weight thanks to our Fitbit Charge HRs and calorie tracking. My wife's physical therapist is also having her work on balance exercises. In another year, a monohull may become practical, though we still want to try multi and power also. We'll see how those turn out.

Tim
 

·
Learning the HARD way...
Joined
·
7,834 Posts
You had ASA 101 on a Jenneau 39 / Hunter 34?! It is usually taught on a boat with a tiller;
Learn to skipper a 20' - 27' sloop-rigged keelboat by day, in light to moderate winds and sea conditions. Learn basic sailing terminology, parts and functions, helm commands, basic sail trim, points of sail, buoyage, seamanship and safety including basic navigation rules to avoid collisions and hazards.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
You had ASA 101 on a Jenneau 39 / Hunter 34?! It is usually taught on a boat with a tiller;
I had seen the kids out tipping their small boats over in the community classes. I'm 50 years old and not quite that agile any more. In my 103, I was the youngest of our group. With four adult students and the instructor on board, water temps of 45F, and all of us overnighting on the boat for a weekend course, I appreciated the extra size. Also, it is a charter oriented school. These boats were likely to be chartered by the students training on them. The boats available to teach on were what individual owners had put in to charter. I appreciated the boat exposure variety and think it was great. :)
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top