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Dear Sailors!

I have a request; I need your help!

My name is Marc, I am a 21-year-old from Switzerland who would like to learn how to sail and practise Spanish at the same time.

My target is South America.

If you had two months to spend whereever you wanted to, to fill with the abovementioned - where would you go?

Thank you very much for any response in advance!

Cheers, Marc
 

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The only place I have been is Costa Rica, for a family vacation, but all four of us, including our teenagers, loved it and plan to return. People all over the country made
us feel welcome. We could usually find someone, even in small towns, who spoke English, but all of us expanded our Spanish skills. Costa Ricans appreciated when we tried our limited Spanish and were patient in helping us. The food was great and the water good.

We loved the beaches. Tourist services were good. We did two different rain forest canopy zipline tours and they were well built and safe. I was told that they are inspected by the government as amusement rides.

I did not sail there but found this sailing school on line.

http://costaricasailing.com/aboutus/

Be aware of the type of training you get, that it will be accepted by your charter operators back home, or wherever you intend to charter. I received my bareboat skippers certification from Canada, according to Canadian Yachting Association standards. It has been accepted by USA charter operators but I have heard that some European operators require British or French training.

Other people on here will likely know more about this.
 

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Argentina. They have have the most developed sailing tradition in South America, lots of sailing clubs, chandleries and schools. It's quite cheap to live there. You can sail year-round in the estuary of the Rio de la Plata (although the winter can be quite windy and chilly). Plus it's a wonderful country to travel in- nice people, great food and charming cities and towns.
 

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Argentina. They have have the most developed sailing tradition in South America, lots of sailing clubs, chandleries and schools. It's quite cheap to live there. You can sail year-round in the estuary of the Rio de la Plata (although the winter can be quite windy and chilly). Plus it's a wonderful country to travel in- nice people, great food and charming cities and towns.
Is Argentina Spanish speaking or Portuguese?
 

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Gee, what's wrong with Spain? It's close, no visa required, inexpensive compared to your home, and has lots of sailing? I'd certainly start there, rather than fork out for trans-Atlantic round trip airfare to a place I'm not sure I'd even like.
 

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Well, Google notwithstanding...
Argentina is a Spanish-speaking country, although there is a fairly large English-speaking community. There are also enclaves that speak Welsh (in Patagonia), German, Italian and a smattering of other languages. But, by a large margin- they speak Spanish.
Portuguese is spoken in Brazil.
 

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Ian may have temporarily forgotten about the The Treaty of Tordesillas that resulted from the 1493 Papal decree, and that this treaty signed at Tordesillas on June 7, 1494, and authenticated at Setúbal, Portugal, divided the newly discovered lands outside Europe between the Portuguese Empire and the Crown of Castile, along a meridian 370 leagues[note 1] west of the Cape Verde islands, off the west coast of Africa. This line of demarcation was about halfway between the Cape Verde islands (already Portuguese) and the islands entered by Christopher Columbus on his first voyage (claimed for Castile and León), named in the treaty as Cipangu and Antilia (Cuba and Hispaniola).

The lands to the east would belong to Portugal and the lands to the west to Castile. The treaty was signed by Spain, 2 July 1494 and by Portugal, 5 September 1494. The other side of the world was divided a few decades later by the Treaty of Zaragoza, signed on 22 April 1529, which specified the antimeridian to the line of demarcation specified in the Treaty of Tordesillas. Originals of both treaties are kept at the Archivo General de Indias in Spain and at the Arquivo Nacional da Torre do Tombo in Portugal.[8]

This treaty would be observed fairly well by Spain and Portugal, despite considerable ignorance as to the geography of the New World; however, it omitted all of the other European powers. Those countries generally ignored the treaty, particularly those that became Protestant after the Protestant Reformation.

I am glad that, we could clear that up. Now back to the show already in progress......(By the way, this is a 5 month old question from a one time poster.- Jus' say'n)

Jeff
 
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I've never sailed in South America but I have ridden a motorcycle through a big chunk of it. Argentina and Chile are the closest you'll find to a first world country. A fellow traveler described Argentina as a first world country at third world prices. Probably not too relevant for a sailor but in parts of Argentina near the Andes you could think that you were still in Switzerland.

If you're looking for drunken debauchery, I would highly recommend Brazil.
 

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Columbia and Panama. Ecuador is pretty tough going so I hear.

I have sailed Argentina to mar del Plata. There to Uraguay it meant to be good.
 

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From everything I've read and from a few folks I've met and talked to who have been there, Uruguay is the country to immigrate to in SA. Absolutely immigrant friendly, to the point one not even need to leave the country to change one's immigration status, as one must do in most countries of the world. Sailing is supposed to be pretty good there, with a lot of river sailing and some very interesting coastal cruising from Uruguay south or north to Brazil.
When I was researching it, one could apparently sail in, get the proper immigration status and be operating one's boat as a charter boat with little or no hassles or fees fairly easily.
 
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