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Discussion Starter #1
Good Hello, and Thank you in advance for your time and information.
I'm seeking advice on the approximate value of a boat listed in the Portland Oregon Craigslist. ad listed as Skookum Pilothouse, if you care to visit the listing. (*details below)
I cant seem to find any comparisons for evaluation of this
Skookum pilothouse model. I am considering purchasing this as a first time sailboat owner, sailing inland on the Columbia river in Oregon.

Any help in determining the boats value would be greatly appreciated.

Again thanks in advance, The Newbie


*What you're looking at is a one of a kind ed monk skookum pilothouse. There were only about 50 ever made most at sizes of 47 and 53 feet these boats were built sturdy as sail assisted commercial fishing vessels in the Pacific Northwest. Jouster my skookum pilothouse has a 28 foot hull with a boom kin and bow sprit extending the rigging to 32 ft. Built stout for offshore sailing with bronze fittings and portholes, a modified full keel, and outboard well, wheel steering in the pilot house and tiller steering in the cockpit, a self tacking jib, backstay tensioner, radar reflector, depth sounder, VHF radio, 24" led flat screen on swivel mount, ice maker, gimbaled stove, wood solid fuel stove, shower sump and solar shower, manual washing machine, brass gimbaled oil lantern, manual windlass winch set up with 35 pound cqr anchor, pressurized water with two compartment sink and Water filter, bronze manual faucet head, fully insulated interior covered in beautifully sculpted mohagany, electric heater, power inverter, solar panel, 50 gallon water tank and 14 external, mast steps, spreader lights (not working), hand laid fiberglass, 2006 yamaha 9.9 high thrust four stroke with about 50 hours on it and another yamaha 9.9 as a backup, a 3 hp tanaka 2 stroke for the atomic bombard inflatable dinghy skiff with ridged bottom, this boat was built almost excessively well for rough ocean capabilities.

 

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Bombay Explorer 44
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Impossible to answer the question even if you had provided some extra key details like the year and construction material eg wood/steel/grp.

In some areas they are chainsawing boats like this especially if they are wood. They have negative value.

Do your due diligence on what needs doing add that up then look to see what other 28 footers with OBs are fetching.
 

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It's still for sale, so the market says it is not worth $25K... today. because there are so few, thus so few for sale, a reliable current market valuation is damn near impossible.
How much are you willing to pay?
If you are willing to pay more than half his asking price, offer half. if the seller says no, then haggle until you agree or until you reach YOUR top dollar.




I will caution that it is a heavy craft, powered by a 9.9 hp outboard. something tells me there is likely a dead lump of an inboard hiding beneath the cockpit.
 

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Warm Weather Sailor
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Actually there is really no way to determine the "value" of this boat. It's a one off, no comparisons. Even with comparisons in common makes and models of boats, boat "A" may sell for thousands more than boat "B". Condition counts a lot in boats. In the final analysis it's what you're willing to pay and whether the seller will accept your offer. From the pics she looks sweet but she could be wood and rotting. The paint looks good. :)
 

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What you're looking at is a one of a kind and it is very easy to see all the homemade stuff like the self tacking boom and some what scary heating system

I think that pretty much tells all
 

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Dirt Free
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According to soldboats.com there has not been much action on this model for years and
all were sold in the Pacific north west.

a 1977 model sold for $12,000 in 2000
a 1982 model sold for $29,000 in 1996
a 1982 model sold for $33,500 in 2003
a 1982 model sold for $33,500 in 2004

All of these were before the boat market crashed in 2008 where most boats lost 40% of there value almost overnight. This seller appears extremely optimistic.
 

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██▓▓▒▒░&
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Let's see, an oddball boat built for ocean crossings with a 9.9hp outboard motor.

I'll callously say it is worth the price of the used motor, less the cost of having the rest hauled away to a landfill that will accept it.

And the dreamer or scoundrel selling it (hard to guess which it is) knows that pretty well in any case.

If you wanted a fishing cabin to park up some river, that could be it. Just bear in mind the cost of disposal in case you get tired of it and can't sell it.
 

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It seems to be a strange thing to boot. Most pilot houses are bigger than that boat for a reason, you don't really get useable space till you get over 35 or so feet. It basically breaks the space up into too small of spaces. Also with the added windage and normally smaller sail plans they are designed to be motor sailors. I would not want a motor sailor with an outboard, and a boat that heavy that does not sound like enough motor, and you need more motor in a motor sailor. The interior looks like a mixed bag, some looks high quality others don't that wood stove does not look like it would meet an insurance survey. The louvered doors behind look like pine doors that came from Home Depot.

While pilothouses add a bit of value, unknown custom designs are normally a big negative. If the boat was not a pilot house and was of known manufacture it would likely be in $5 to $6,000 range possibly a little bit more if in excellent shape, a lot less if not in good shape. Remember the only time it is considered a "32 foot boat" is when you are paying for a slip, it is a 28 foot boat. So add $6,000 for the pilot house, subtract $10,000 for the fact that it looks to be home built, and add about $800 for the dingy. So it is really hard to say. Really comes down to who made it, who designed it and can you find someone who wants it, and has the money.

I don't think he will ever see $25,000, question is will someone ever give them what they think it may be worth? What happens with boats like this is they sit on the market and rot, then it gets cut up.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
To the SailNet community. Thanks for helping me decide..... :)

It is with sincere appreciation that I post this.
The years of knowledge and experience, along with quick replies, and depth of information shared, leaves me to grateful on a lot of levels.

Thank you all individually and as well as a
community for your feed back and support.

The real VALUE here for me the kind willingness to share your Wisdom.

The happiest of new years to the folks who
make this forum what it is.

Respectively, Quin
 
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