SailNet Community banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello

Found a photo of this beautiful old sailing boat from the 1930s I believe - what style is it? Does it have a specific name? And who would still be making traditional boats like these in Europe?

139578


Thanks!
 

·
Administrator
Farr 11.6 (Farr 38)
Joined
·
9,833 Posts
That looks like one of Dr.. Manfred Curry's designs. His designs were very advanced designs for their day. The give away is the full battens which came from his wind tunnel testing in the Fokker wind tunnel as a teenager. Based on the sail numher, it would suggest that probably at least 3 of these were built.

As to who builds boats like these, no one, some folks, or lots of folks. No one literally builds that design, There are still (mostly small yacht yards) who build traditional wooden boats (That is not a traditional wooden boat.) . I believe that Curry's boats were mostly Ashcroft construction. I doubt that anyone builds with Ashcroft construction any more. Today they would be built with some variation of WEST construction or fiberglass. If you literally wanted to build that boat and had a couple hundred thousand Euros sitting around to burn, you would need to either find an archival set of his drawings, or have a similar boat designed from scratch.

But there is a lot about that design that anticipates modern yacht design theory. So in fact there are a lot of manufacturers who build modern versions of that boat,

Jeff
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That looks like one of Dr.. Manfred Curry's designs. His designs were very advanced designs for their day. The give away is the full battens which came from his wind tunnel testing in the Fokker wind tunnel as a teenager. Based on the sail numher, it would suggest that probably at least 3 of these were built.

As to who builds boats like these, no one, some folks, or lots of folks. No one literally builds that design, There are still (mostly small yacht yards) who build traditional wooden boats (That is not a traditional wooden boat.) . I believe that Curry's boats were mostly Ashcroft construction. I doubt that anyone builds with Ashcroft construction any more. Today they would be built with some variation of WEST construction or fiberglass. If you literally wanted to build that boat and had a couple hundred thousand Euros sitting around to burn, you would need to either find an archival set of his drawings, or have a similar boat designed from scratch.

But there is a lot about that design that anticipates modern yacht design theory. So in fact there are a lot of manufacturers who build modern versions of that boat,

Jeff
Thanks Jeff, great detailed response!

So perhaps a better question might be, do you know which boatyards still build boats "similar" to this (just in terms of function and design/appearance), but still made in wood, rather than say fibreglass?

Thanks!
 

·
Administrator
Farr 11.6 (Farr 38)
Joined
·
9,833 Posts
I don't really understand what you are looking for. The boat in the first picture is an extremely advanced design for it's day that largely anticipates our current understanding of what makes a boat that is seaworthy, easily handled, has a comfortable motion, and would perform well.

The Spirit Yachts' images are of a boat that while well constructed, is little more than a caricature of boats built under archaic and obsolete racing rules that offer none of those characteristics. In other words, they are a grossly expensive sailing equivalent of tail fins on a Cadillac.

While both are built of wood, they are opposites in terms of what they sail like.

But also, if that is one of Manfred Curry's designs, they were extremely light and strong due to very careful engineering, detailing and materials chosen. The Ashcroft building technique that I understand that he preferred, used wood as an engineered material, essentially creating a boat that effectively was a single monolithic piece of handmade plywood in the shape of a boat. Ashcroft was later replaced with what became known as (hot) molded plywood, and evolved into Wood-Epoxy-Saturation-Technique or Cold Molded Plywood. These techniques produced boats that did not rely on caulking to remain sealed and so could be allowed to dry out without leaking.

There are still quite a few small boat yards that can build custom cold molded boats in the US. There used to be a lot of small yards in Britain, Italy, and Scandinavia that could also produce a custom cold molded boats pretty affordably. There were several in South Africa as well. I assume that they are still out there, but I have not heard of them in a while.

Jeff
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top