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Discussion Starter #1
I have been looking for a windvane but i havent been able to find any used vanes under around 1500 or so so i have decided to build one myself does anyone know hopw i can go about doing it. like plans step by step instructionms materials etc or a website or book would be appresciated thanks oh and the boat is a contest 30 the original one with the doghouse so loa around 30 feet 6 inches without the bowsprit and displacement loaded around 10 000 pounds maybe a bit more long fin keel large heavy skeg mounted rudder its a masthead rig just if it helps to know its not fractional
 

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I've seen plans online to build them out of PVC, perhaps you could make it work by using different material.

On review, the bookmark I have is no longer functional.

Sorry.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
thanks everyone i think ill get the book, and check out the one online too. Do you know what the difficulty levelin building is for somone with no real engineering or math backround would it be relativelly straightforward. and again thanks for the suggestions sounds like a good start. :)
 

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How is your machining ability, and access to tools? Got a lathe? Milling machine? Drill press? Access to raw materials? Metal casting ability? Bronze, stainless steel, UHMW? Can you tig weld? If not maybe you could find an old frozen Monitor, or Aries that would be easier to repair than re inventing the thing. I have all the tools, materials, and ability, I still bought a Hydrovane....:)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
id say nonexistent i mean ive never worked with metal before, unless soldering electrical connections count, so im guessing thT MEns i ahould go the used route but what is the cheapest i could get a windvane for that i could repair, a few hundred i suppose, but where do these get old all ive seen is used monitors for upwards of 3 grand and i have about 1500 to budget max but in all honesty thts me stretching it if it were a few hundred id be much happier. as dor tools i could always rent them or borrow from a friend im oretty sure i know somone who might have them btw does it have to be made out of metal or could i mold one in fiberglass with hardwood coring
 

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Most monitors I have seen used as well as other brands for reasonable prices need re-building.

You could certainly mold the rudder blade out of fiberglass but that is the easy part - it is the mechanism that is complicated and needs stainless or aluminum as well as smooth bearings. For any welding there are competent shops that can do that for you. Many home made vanes I have heard about take quite a bit of fiddling to get right.

Go through the book I linked to - it is very complete and explains all types of vane gear - decide what might be best for your boat and budget from that.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
i actually breezed thru it yesterday and i got the impression that the mechanism for a vertical or a servo pendulum seems pretty simple although i di only skim it, if i do choose to rebuild one where can i find them im thinking maybe rebuilding a navik because they seem cheaper or one of those discontinued vanes from the 70s but the thing about that book is it didnt have as much on how to build it as how it worked but yes from the book i got that having a long shoal fin and a skeg mounted inboard rudder pretty much i can go with anything exceot a trim tab and im inclined to go towards either a vertical or a servo pendulum vane because they have better damping than a horizontal vane now from the looks of it all i have realy is a giant propeler type thing with a rudder on one end and a wind blade on the other that when it is pushed tugs on the tiller or have i got it wrong
 

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Discussion Starter #14
maybe its a little more complicated than i thought so the idea is if it veers of course the wind pushes against the paddle which turns the gear which in turn both turnes the tiller and adjusts the trim tab...hmm it does sound rather difficult to design myself would i save anymoney designing by hand vs repairing a frozen up one anyways if not or not dsignificant then i might as welll search for a frozenn navik it seems small and simple enough to be cheap but strong enough to be reliable but where can i look for one i checked craigslist and kijiji and the chandelry where i live wont actually sell anything usefull although if u ever feel the need to have a 14 inch chartplotter they do have those and my boat lives rather in the middle of nowhere atm so no good chandlery or consignemtn store there either and i checked ebay too
 

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Hey

Below is a forum dedicated to the topic, windvanes and the building of them;
Cruising Sailor • View forum - Windvane Forum

Walt's site is very worth-while, sadly he passed away several years ago so the site is an archive, not an on-going/regularly updated site of his work.

Good luck.

John
 

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With a Servo pendulum vane, the airvane is set when you are on course. As the boat moves off course the airvane pivots down to one side or the other. When this happens the paddle in the water turns and the force of the boat's movement against the paddle swings it to one side or the other, creating the force to bring the boat back on course with the lines to the tiller.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
oh ok so pretty much the lines are attached to the in water part of the gear, which is in turn connected by a gear to the airfoil, that makes sense so how does that compare to the vertical vane and why is it better like for example a hasler according to theat book is a vertical vae and it looks simmilar except without the gear thing
 

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Might also look at John Letcher's "Self-Steering for Sailing Craft" - long out of print but I got one from Amazon's used books; he covers the engineering part and shows many simple ways to accomplish self-steering including wind vanes
 

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The early Hasler vanes were vertical pivot on the vane. Most like the Monitor, Norvane, and many others use a horizontal pivot which is more sensitive in light winds and the vane can be smaller as a result. Here is a picture of a Norvane on a 28' Triton and while you can't see the entire unit you can see that the wind blade is quite small but it is very effective in lighter winds. Below it is a distance shot of the same vane on a CT34.
 

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