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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm installing a Deck Organizer on my 30' sailboat to run the main halyard and reef lines to the cockpit. I'd like to raise the Organizer up & level it to minimize resistance as well as keep the lines off the deck so they stay somewhat clean. Given the slope & curvature of the deck, I'm curious as to what material & how to best shape it. I've purchased a piece of teak stock 10" L x 3" W x 2" D and how to best shape this without error has me puzzled. Ideas on other materials or best method to measure & cut the teak is greatly appreciated. Thank you
 

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Farr 11.6 (Farr 38)
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I had to do this a while ago on a prior boat. I used a piece of 1/4" fiberglass sheet good (in that case G10). I cut the G10 to shape and sanded the bottom with really course paper. I threaded a couple small screws into the G-10 that I could use to experiment and adjust the height and angle until It ended up in a satisfactory position (the screws only touched the deck but did not enter it. Then I taped couple layers of wax paper to the deck and mixed up some thickened epoxy (thickened polyester would work, but I like working with epoxy), which I coated the bottom of the G10 thick enough to fill the gaps between the G10 and the deck. I pushed the G10 and epoxy onto the wax paper until the screws touched and cleaned up the edges. Then left it until the epoxy cured. Once cured, I sanded and painted the whole riser. Then installed the organizer. That seemed faster and easier than making the riser out of anything else,

I have also made risers out of teak by making templates of the deck on 4 sides, marking them on the sides of the teak, rough cutting the teak, then duct taping a very course piece of sandpaper (36) to the deck with the sanding side up and moving the teak block back and forth over the sand paper to more closely fit it to the deck. That worked on a smaller block but was a lot more work.

Jeff
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I had to do this a while ago on a prior boat. I used a piece of 1/4" fiberglass sheet good (in that case G10). I cut the G10 to shape and sanded the bottom with really course paper. I threaded a couple small screws into the G-10 that I could use to experiment and adjust the height and angle until It ended up in a satisfactory position (the screws only touched the deck but did not enter it. Then I taped couple layers of wax paper to the deck and mixed up some thickened epoxy (thickened polyester would work, but I like working with epoxy), which I coated the bottom of the G10 thick enough to fill the gaps between the G10 and the deck. I pushed the G10 and epoxy onto the wax paper until the screws touched and cleaned up the edges. Then left it until the epoxy cured. Once cured, I sanded and painted the whole riser. Then installed the organizer. That seemed faster and easier than making the riser out of anything else,

I have also made risers out of teak by making templates of the deck on 4 sides, marking them on the sides of the teak, rough cutting the teak, then duct taping a very course piece of sandpaper (36) to the deck with the sanding side up and moving the teak block back and forth over the sand paper to more closely fit it to the deck. That worked on a smaller block but was a lot more work.

Jeff
Thanks Jeff, Sounds like a plan using the 1/4" G10 and epoxy. Have never used any of these materials before. Question; Ideally one corner of the block would be approx 2" thick and the opposite end about 3/4". Given this thickness for the block is the epoxy able to form this volume in one application?
 

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Farr 11.6 (Farr 38)
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Thanks Jeff, Sounds like a plan using the 1/4" G10 and epoxy. Have never used any of these materials before. Question; Ideally one corner of the block would be approx 2" thick and the opposite end about 3/4". Given this thickness for the block is the epoxy able to form this volume in one application?
Unfortunately the answer is no, it doesn't make sense to build up 2" of thickened epoxy. In my case the top of the middle of the base was basically 1/4" off the deck and the edges maybe 3/8" above the deck. The thickened epoxy was only there to deal with the curvature of the deck.

I had to raise a set of halyard locks about 2" above the deck on my current boat. I bought some 4" x 2" rectangular aluminum tubing that was long enough to hold all of the halyard locks. I had the aluminum powder coated white, which did not hold up as well as I would have hoped Frankly it works very well, but I have never thought it was particularly attractive.

Jeff
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Unfortunately the answer is no, it doesn't make sense to build up 2" of thickened epoxy. In my case the top of the middle of the base was basically 1/4" off the deck and the edges maybe 3/8" above the deck. The thickened epoxy was only there to deal with the curvature of the deck.

I had to raise a set of halyard locks about 2" above the deck on my current boat. I bought some 4" x 2" rectangular aluminum tubing that was long enough to hold all of the halyard locks. I had the aluminum powder coated white, which did not hold up as well as I would have hoped Frankly it works very well, but I have never thought it was particularly attractive.

Jeff
Thanks Jeff for your advise. You've given me some ideas and I think I'll apply a hybrid of them, although I'm still doing some research. Really appreciate the advise
Steve
Thanks Mark. I've seen this tool advertised a while ago & had forgotten what it was. Planning to pick one up. Thanks
Steve
 

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I could see teak working. It would be one of my least preferred materials, as my boat doesn't have any exterior wood, and I'd like to keep it that way.

Not having seen your boat and what you're trying to accomplish, I wonder if stainless steel would be a possibility. Some stock about 1/8" thick more or less. I had a local fabricator (non-marine) make up some stainless pieces for me to mount an auto pilot on my previous boat. It was under $100 as I recall. I gave them measured drawings (high school drafting class comes in handy now and then), and they made them. Had a couple 90 degree angles on one of the pieces.

You could use cardboard to make up a model and submit that to the fabricator. If I didn't have a local fabricator, or maybe even if I did, I would get in touch with Garhaeur (sp?) Marine and see if they could handle it. I've had them make replacement stanchions for me per my specs, and they were very reasonable. Considering they make line organizers and many other deck items, they might be a good source.

Also, with a stainless riser, you'd attach it to your deck like any other piece of hardware. Screws and sealer. 3M 4200 or if you can get your mits on some good butyl tape that'd be another option.
 

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Great idea....I've had Garhauer fabricate a variety of custom items and been very pleased with their work.

Jeff
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I could see teak working. It would be one of my least preferred materials, as my boat doesn't have any exterior wood, and I'd like to keep it that way.

Not having seen your boat and what you're trying to accomplish, I wonder if stainless steel would be a possibility. Some stock about 1/8" thick more or less. I had a local fabricator (non-marine) make up some stainless pieces for me to mount an auto pilot on my previous boat. It was under $100 as I recall. I gave them measured drawings (high school drafting class comes in handy now and then), and they made them. Had a couple 90 degree angles on one of the pieces.

You could use cardboard to make up a model and submit that to the fabricator. If I didn't have a local fabricator, or maybe even if I did, I would get in touch with Garhaeur (sp?) Marine and see if they could handle it. I've had them make replacement stanchions for me per my specs, and they were very reasonable. Considering they make line organizers and many other deck items, they might be a good source.

Also, with a stainless riser, you'd attach it to your deck like any other piece of hardware. Screws and sealer. 3M 4200 or if you can get your mits on some good butyl tape that'd be another option.
Thanks, I have considerable teak (reason for wanting to use it) but am now leaning toward making a template and using epoxy & filler material. Will require painting I will keep you all posted on which way I go & the results
 
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