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Discussion Starter #1
I'm 28 years old and have been dreaming of sailing since I was 15 years old. I've taken short trips on small boats and crewed aboard a boat in Nicaragua that was a disaster. Though I will never forget the rail in the water at 8 knots, the bioluminence plankton(or whatever it is) coming in contact with the hull, and the starlight, giving me a profound sense of the vastness of the universe. Despite the fact that I ended up stranded in El Salvador the dream is still more alive than ever.

I guess I wanted to introduce myself on here, and share my dream with people who could understand. I also wouldn't mind hearing ideas from a lot of sailors out there on how to make it a reality. Tips and Bits of Wisdom are much needed.

I know that I need to at least sail the south pacific in my lifetime. So 10 years from now I hope have a boat ready, or the money to buy one(which would be the better option?). I am good at construction and mechanics, so my main idea is to buy a project boat from 40' to 50'(cannot stop scouring the websites looking at boats for sale) and slowly but surely build it into exactly the boat that fits my personality and the practicality of sailing blue waters over the course of years. My current career is a sure thing for the next 10 years and so I know that I'll be living at the same location, and hope to have the boat in my backyard.

Though I wouldn't mind hearing what some sailors out there have to say, about the dream. If there is a better path to make it a reality. I'll list a few questions that come to mind, and would greatly appreciate any responses.

-Would it be wiser to buy a boat or rebuild a boat? (I've got consistent income, but I am far being rich)
-What size boat would you recommend and why? (It will be My wife and I and any kids we have in the next 10 years)
-Are there ways of making money while sailing, other than internet work?
-(For the older salty sailors out there) if you could do anything differently to your boat or sailing adventures what would you do?
-Any words of wisdom to a 28 year old looking to see the South pacific on the horizon?
-If you know of anyone looking to get rid of a project sailboat(35' +), please let me know.

Thank you kindly!
 

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Sailing the South Seas is a grand dream. It was my dream since I was about 7.
Now some realities. Very few people save any money or even end up getting their project boat up to ocean sailing seaworthiness for less than they could buy a boat that is as ready to go as is possible, which still isn't really ready to go. There is little similarity between carpentry and boat building.
The size of the boat will be defined by your sailing abilities, not by the size of your family. If, in the next ten years you can really get in some sailing time (another reason to buy a boat ready to sail instead of one you have to work on for years) in all kinds of conditions, then perhaps a 50 footer would be OK. But if you aren't able to get out on the water a lot (and the only way to really learn to sail is by doing it) then you should consider a smaller and easier boat to sail, dock and anchor.
I would recommend you buy a small boat that you and your wife can learn to sail on (say 14 to 18 feet) rather than jump into a big project boat. Once you've mastered that dinghy you can move up to something in the 20 odd foot range that you can take farther afield and even spend a week or weekend cruising from time to time.
Realistically, unless you have a trade that nobody else has where you are, working while you are cruising isn't easy. Very very few countries are going to allow you to take jobs from their citizens and work permits are usually expensive and difficult to obtain. Working for other cruisers is also forbidden. My suggestion is to set up a fixed monthly income you can survive on comfortably before you go.
I'd be hesitant to jump into a project boat or even the greatest deal on a well found boat until we see how this pandemic is going to affect international travel down the line, which once again brings you into a small boat to learn to sail on, for now.
Good luck and have fun.
 

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Look for something under 40', preferably well under. A larger boat will eat up your money, time and probably kill your actually getting under way. You'll need at least $10,000 a year to cruise and that's doing it with very little time sitting in bars or restaurants drinking Maitai's and eating poi'son cru. There are a lot of boats 30'-35' for sale with a good diesel, rigging and sails for under $30,000, often well under, that you could add a self steering vane and go. You don't need more in the way of electronics than a good GPS, Epirb, depth sounder, and an Inreach Explorer. A new or lightly used set of sails, main, furling jib and 135% genoa, a light air sail and a storm jib. You don't need refrigeration and is nearly useless when off the beaten path unless you have a super efficient freezer.

Buying a project is fine but it will probably not save you any money unless you get it dirt cheap with a good engine and put a ton of sweat equity into it. The main advantage of rehabbing a boat is that you'll intimately know every thing you do to it, the gear you'll add and won't have any expensive gotcha's that will eat your cruising kitty when you're out there for at least the first couple of years. You'll be able to do the work and pay for the gear as you go. Most of the people we met that continued to cruise went on a cruiser lifestyle several years before they departed, lived frugally, and sunk every spare nickel into the boat or cruising kitty. By time they went cruising the life seemed a relief.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you for the replies. So what I gather is that it would be prudent to get a smaller boat, for both the time and money concerns.
As far as project boats go, the point roverhi made is one of the main reasons I am interested in a project boat, which is that I want know every inch of my vessel before taking a major trip. The second reason, is that I live about 3 hours away from the Atlantic right now, so I would be keeping the project boat in my backyard, making it convenient to rebuild and customize.

Well, two things I can start doing now, is looking at smaller boats, and start living the cruising life style to start saving and preparing for the moment when I can head out.

I appreciate the responses, and if anyone else on sailnet has anything to chime in with, I welcome all the help I can get.
 

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If you are inland, Id recommend getting a nice trailerable boat for now. Typically that is something under 26 feet. A boat of this size can be affordable, you can sleep on it, and most importantly learn to sail with it.

Sailing the oceans with little to no income is a hard road IMO. But folks do it all the time. At my stage in life, I prefer a little more comfort. You will have to have either enough savings to last your hiatus, or have a source of income. And I would not count on that income coming from a local source (where you are located at the time). Think rental property income, or internet based jobs.

There are a few sailing youtube channels I watch. One may give you some ideas- Project Aticus. They started out on a shoestring. I think they still are, but they must be getting some income from their videos. But it may give you an idea about boat size and life on board for two people.
 

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I'm 28 years old and have been dreaming of sailing since I was 15 years old. I've taken short trips on small boats and crewed aboard a boat in Nicaragua that was a disaster. Though I will never forget the rail in the water at 8 knots, the bioluminence plankton(or whatever it is) coming in contact with the hull, and the starlight, giving me a profound sense of the vastness of the universe. Despite the fact that I ended up stranded in El Salvador the dream is still more alive than ever.

I guess I wanted to introduce myself on here, and share my dream with people who could understand. I also wouldn't mind hearing ideas from a lot of sailors out there on how to make it a reality. Tips and Bits of Wisdom are much needed.

I know that I need to at least sail the south pacific in my lifetime. So 10 years from now I hope have a boat ready, or the money to buy one(which would be the better option?). I am good at construction and mechanics, so my main idea is to buy a project boat from 40' to 50'(cannot stop scouring the websites looking at boats for sale) and slowly but surely build it into exactly the boat that fits my personality and the practicality of sailing blue waters over the course of years. My current career is a sure thing for the next 10 years and so I know that I'll be living at the same location, and hope to have the boat in my backyard.

Though I wouldn't mind hearing what some sailors out there have to say, about the dream. If there is a better path to make it a reality. I'll list a few questions that come to mind, and would greatly appreciate any responses.

-Would it be wiser to buy a boat or rebuild a boat? (I've got consistent income, but I am far being rich)
-What size boat would you recommend and why? (It will be My wife and I and any kids we have in the next 10 years)
-Are there ways of making money while sailing, other than internet work?
-(For the older salty sailors out there) if you could do anything differently to your boat or sailing adventures what would you do?
-Any words of wisdom to a 28 year old looking to see the South pacific on the horizon?
-If you know of anyone looking to get rid of a project sailboat(35' +), please let me know.

Thank you kindly!
Like you, I have taken short trips on small boats when I was younger. Then life got in the way. You mention the south Pacific. It's not south; it's about 5 to 15 deg N, but would you be interested in RT from the west coast to the Philippines? Target date is within twelve months from now; some time before fall 2021. I also have a can't fail idea for generating income while cruising but it takes partnership with at least one other individual. Message me privately via e-mail.
 

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Like you, I have taken short trips on small boats when I was younger. Then life got in the way. You mention the south Pacific. It's not south; it's about 5 to 15 deg N, but would you be interested in RT from the west coast to the Philippines? Target date is within twelve months from now; some time before fall 2021. I also have a can't fail idea for generating income while cruising but it takes partnership with at least one other individual. Message me privately via e-mail.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
There are a few sailing youtube channels I watch. One may give you some ideas- Project Aticus. They started out on a shoestring. I think they still are, but they must be getting some income from their videos. But it may give you an idea about boat size and life on board for two people.
Thanks Crispy Cringle, I have seen that youtube channel, I watch a lot of the youtube channels avidly. Right now I'm checking out the brazilian couple from odd life.

Aticus does seem to be the most frugal of the youtube channels, they were doing well, before corona hit hard. Hopefully, youtube is keeping them going.

If I did do a rebuild, I definitely had it in mind to film the whole process, I'm not sure that I'm would be a good youtuber, but I just feel it would be to good of a project to not share.

Thanks for you thoughts on boat size and income.
 

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The Pacific is much larger than the Atlantic. Passages are much longer. Need to be self sufficient the same or greater. Read the Dreaming thread recently started on this site. Look at what boats have done the world ARC, ocean rallies, and those listed as safe blue water boats. Look at boats that have had catastrophic failure. Most are project boats.
This function is very different than liveaboard or coastal.If you wish to be successful you’d be better off in a boat designed initially for blue water voyaging. Not one for charter work or coastal use. Do not depend on EU rating. If new outfitted for such. If old used for that purpose, in decent shape and requiring limited updating.
The numbers for project boats going voyaging are dismal. For home built being completed the same. A one and done single trip is very different then you're actually wishing to cruise. If cruising with more than yourself you’ve increased the complexity of the boat, size, expense by multiples.
 

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Out.... I am not advocating project boats for sure. You do not "need" a 45-54' boat to sail around the world. Ask Laura Dekker.
 

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I wish theat sailing and cruising dream were closer to the sailing and cruising reality.
I wish the OP good luck with fair wind and “happy” seas (because the reality is that following seas kind of suck)
 

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Why wait ten years? Get started sailing now and build up to bigger boats/adventures. Your planning on having kids, which is great, but you may not realize that this means most of your free time will disappear. It will be much harder to start when you have kids, mortgage, career and all of the responsibilities that go along with that.
 
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