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Neighbor gave me an old Whistler than had been left outside for many years. Have the hull, mast and beam. Needs a centerboard, rudder, tiller and some TLC. Sails will be the last thing. Just looking for help with locating parts or dimensions of parts. I sailed Thistles in regional and national competitions during grad school. Just looking for something to work on as I start retirement.
 

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Thanks for the link. Anything helps! Any clue on where to find centerboard, rudder, tiller, sail info? All of those are missing and I'll have to purchase, steal or fabricate.
 

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Thanks for the link. Anything helps! Any clue on where to find centerboard, rudder, tiller, sail info? All of those are missing and I'll have to purchase, steal or fabricate.
All of those are pretty easy to replace. If you have the mast, boom and the profile drawing here: https://sailboatdata.com/sailboat/whistler-11

The key will be blowing the profile up to scale or importing it into a computer drafting program and stretching it to scale. The shape of the rudder is pretty easy to replicate. The blade was probably cut from a sheet of 5/16" (maybe 1/4") aluminum as was the rudder cheeks and the centerboard. You could probably make the rudder parts out of wood, but the wood would need to be sealed and the rudder blade weighted so it would not float up while you were sailing. Similarly, if the centerboard trunk is wide enough, the centerboard could also probably be made out of wood as well, but it will need to be glassed over and weighted. The tiller was probably clear spruce and very easy to make.

To fabricate the centerboard, I would make a pattern out of 1/4" 'door skin" plywood. The hidden part of the centerboard is pretty easy to figure out as is the length. The centerboard is essentially a rectangle. The width of the rectangle can be approximated from the profile drawing. The length can be figured out by measuring from the pivot pin to the closest point to the pin forward of the pin and aft of the pin within the centerboard trunk. When making the pattern, I would start by measuring the actual position of the pin from the bottom of the boat and mark that on my pattern. Then swing a radius from the pin that is perhaps a 1/2" shorter than the shortest dimension forward and a 1/2" shorter than the shortest dimension aft. The radius aft is visible on the profile. The radius forward is hidden but easily figured out. Once you had marked up your pattern, cut it out of the 'door skin' pattern and install it in the centerboard trunk and check that it swings all the way down and all the way up. If it does, then trace it onto the aluminum or wood and cut it out with a Jig saw. If you decide to use wood you can give the wood something of a tear drop shape, install a lead puck in the bottom of the wood or a show on the bottom, then glass the whole assembly. I would glass in short length of bronze or copper tubing as a bushing for the centerboard pivot pin.

The rudder assembly is more complex, but I could probably develop a pattern for that pretty easily if you need that.

Even used the sails will probably cost more than the boat will ever be worth. I believe that Whistlers were set up with two mast steps (like many small boats of that era) so they can be rigged either as a catboat or a sloop. The thing that is less obvious is that the shroud lengths are different for the sloop vs the cat. The Saildata profile shows the catboat configuration. You will need to set up the rig on the boat. If the shrouds work with the forward mast step position, your boat was set up as a catboat. If they work with the aft mast step, your boat was sloop rigged. With the mast up and the boom on you should be able to take all of the necessary measurements to buy used sails or failing to find used sails that roughly fit, then to get sails made. If you are handy and have a good quality sewing machine, you might try ordering a kit from Sailrite.

That's about it.

Jeff
 
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