SailNet Community banner
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
5,053 Posts
Reaction score
1,637
A Catalina 250 has a J dimension (distance from forestay connection to mast) of only 9ft. Using (even) a removable forestay will complicate and clutter the foredeck spaces. Plus, the forestay (its now called a forestay as its 'the first stay in front of the mast' and the original forestay now becomes the headstay) will need at least running backstays to prevent the mast from radically bowing forwards when flying a staysail or to lessen the possibility of mast 'pumping'. Your boat only has swept spreaders with a cap shroud to the masthead and a single intermediate shroud running to the spreader base .... not much 'support' for a staysail without complicated structural additions.
Adding an additional 'stay' in front of the mast results in a variable and complicated 'interplay' of 'in front of the mast stay tensions' ... as you still only will have ONE backstay.

Id suggest not to add a staysail and forestay on such a short J-dimension (and relatively short mainsail foot dimension) and relatively narrow beamed boat.
Rather Id suggest for higher wind conditions, to use either a 'storm jib' or a short LP 'blade jib'. Reason is: you already have all the hardware, you dont have to modify the structure of your boat .... and ultimately 'it keeps things SIMPLE': Just reef the main and CHANGE the jib to a 'smaller' one.

Just remember that with your current jib/genoa that if you 'furl' it more than beyond ~30% of its 'full' sail area or LP dimension, the sail shape will become 'deplorable' and all the curvature of the 'broad-seaming' near the luff section will be all 'rolled up' inside the furling. Once you furl beyond that ~30% number on a jib/genoa, its really time to 'change jibs' to a smaller LP jib.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
5,053 Posts
Reaction score
1,637
Since the OP mentioned the difficulty in changing sails on the roller furler, even at anchor, ....... :)
Then, find out what's the 'binding' problem is then correct it ... possibly needs a new 'luff support tape' at the luff, a thorough 'cleaning' of the foil groove, and the liberal usage of a 'dry lubricant' ('McLube', etc.) in the foil groove, etc. Ditto ... investigate the 'lead angle' of the furler top swivel if the furler is 'binding' when using its furling control line, etc. ..... Have a rigger check out the installation and if needed get a sailmaker to the boat.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
5,053 Posts
Reaction score
1,637
He didn't say what made the sail changes hard at anchor.

Catalina boats of this size often have CDI furlers. They have an unusual design that is swivel-less and uses a small diameter halyard that is integral to the furler (this lets them get rid of the expensive top swivel). They are indeed hard to change sails on (or to adjust halyard tension on).

A better use of money might be getting a furler that allows for easier sail changes. A Harken 00AL or Unit 0 furler is in the same ballpark as adding a solent stay.
Good point ! CDI units are only 'really' furlers, not reefing furlers; so maybe, a modern true reefing-furler might be the most appropriate 'correction' here.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top