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Discussion Starter #1
So a few weekends ago I went sailing with friends and had the usual good time. Apparently one of them spilled a good amount of vodka on my salon table. They cleaned it up mostly but didn't get it all I guess. The alcohol ended up leaving a large white clouded area on the center of the table and the port side leaf.

So this past week I tried to fix it like I have done before. I lightly sanded the area to remove the white cloudy spots and when that was gone I cleaned the area and used Minwax indoor polyurethane on it. I've done this before and it came out fine but this time I could still see the spots I sanded down. They show up as a more brown area that's the more reddish existing finish. It's apparent there's a problem.

I believe that the finish Beneteau used on the boat must have a tint in it in order to get a consistent finish. I'm guessing i sanded all the way through the old finish into the wood this last time. My table is made of teak veneer plywood with mahogany trim. The mahogany comes out fine if i sand it down all the way but the teak that I redid is not as red as the undamaged starboard leaf even after many coats. Any suggestions on what finish I could use to make this match again?
 

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Maybe sand down the starboard side to match the damaged leaf.? My wife (who can match paint colors perfectly) and I have tried to match stain before. It just doesn't come out the same.
 

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It may be just varnish, which can darken wood with additional coats. I'd sand down the entire surface you're trying to match, stain if you like, then recoat. Probably the only way to get it to match well.
 

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Just another battle scar and reminder of good times had! Sail more, drink more vodka, and find another project if you are still bored!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I'll probably have to refinish the whole table top.

I have no problem sailing more. The boats ready to go anytime. It's nice when you work 5 minutes from it and can be off the dock in less than 10 minutes only waiting that long to warm up the diesel.
 

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Interesting use of Minwax. I used their spar varnish exclusively on interior and really like the result. May try it on exterior teak when it warms up around here. But I liked the product for interior. Easy to use and look of gloss is great (if ya like gloss). I also have the close to slip arrangement but with my atomic 4 I warm up in half that time. Just sayin :)
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks guys. I used Minwax indoor as that's what I had and I just wanted to do spot repairs. I bought some of the spar varnish and have decided to just strip it all down using a heat gun and scraper and start from scratch.

I usually sail alone or nearly alone with the girl. Crank up the engine and strip covers and get the lines ready to sail. That's about a ten minute deal on my boat as It's more geared as a racer so I've got all the sheets, traveler, car lines etc I need to get ready. From there everything is easy.

I also let the engine get nice and ready now after an event in cold weather. I was hurrying out and the engine died after leaving the slip but before clearing the docks when I shifted to neutral. This wasn't a problem with the previous 30' boat as it was only a 5,000 lb racer. It's a different story trying to control a 22,000 lb boat with a nasty beam wind and no power in a tight space. That was a bit stressful and I have no intention of repeating it.
 

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Be very judicious with the heat-gun/scraper. The veneer on that table is very thin. BTDT...
 

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Why wouldn't you contact Beneteau and ask what they used. It can make all the difference in the world! On our G.S. 37 the mgf used Minwax Colonial Maple stain to make all the teak inside look the same shade. It was nice I guess, but because teak has such a nice natural grain, in some respects it makes it look processed in my opinion.
the other thing about those white spots is that sometimes if you let them go they can/will disappear over time. i read this and have watched this happen with some finishes.
I had to deal with a quarter birth and ceiling behind it that were destroyed by water intrusion from and aft lower chain plate. The owner before us had the dmg repaired by the yard, but they used maple plywood for the ceiling and a dark stain. when I got in the boat after surgery I found the ceiling and the settee base dmgd/junk. I bought new teak ply and applied 2 coats of Minwax and let dry for 4 days, then 2 coats of Minwax urethane. When I put them back in the boat it matched the rest of the interior other than being a little darker. This will lighten up over the next couple of yrs and blend in. Oh yeah the chain plate is fixed also!!!
 
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