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I like his companionway hatch.
It is a good choice for its intended purpose but not as large as I would like. I am about the same size as Glenn and I found it a bit snug - and I wasn't wearing wet weather gear as he will be. For a modification to an existing companionway it is about all you can do. If building new or willing to modify more extensively I would go with the type of door used on some offshore solo boats where the entrance is higher and there is a raised section of the cabin top. Tough to do on a boat this size with a low cabin top though.
 

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Yes, you just can't open the door to outside if it's under water.
I can't imagine it would be any harder than sliding the top slide or removing washboards under pressure. Are you saying that one would not be able to get out of a front hatch either for the same reasons?
 

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I can't imagine it would be any harder than sliding the top slide or removing washboards under pressure. Are you saying that one would not be able to get out of a front hatch either for the same reasons?
That is not at all the same situation, as you are working with water pressure preventing the hatch to be open to the outside. Just like you can't open the car door under water - you have to roll down the window to get out.

Btw. I have nothing but admiration for this sailor, but it is not the type of hatch I would put on my boat, one of the reason being inability to open it under water. the other one is small size, making it not just uncomfortable to get in and out, but also very hard to use when dressed in heavy gear or when injured.
 

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Btw. I have nothing but admiration for this sailor, but it is not the type of hatch I would put on my boat, one of the reason being inability to open it under water. the other one is small size, making it not just uncomfortable to get in and out, but also very hard to use when dressed in heavy gear or when injured.
Neither you nor I are sailing in the Roaring 40's. When using the Jordan Drogue from the stern waves can land in the cockpit and a conventional hatch cannot handle it - lots of water below at the least, loss of hatch at the worst. This is Glenn's second time out there and he learned from the first. Westwind would not stay inverted in any case.
 

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Neither you nor I are sailing in the Roaring 40's. When using the Jordan Drogue from the stern waves can land in the cockpit and a conventional hatch cannot handle it - lots of water below at the least, loss of hatch at the worst. This is Glenn's second time out there and he learned from the first. Westwind would not stay inverted in any case.
Certainly a very valid reason. And I guess if your boat goes down in Southern Ocean you might as well not bother climbing out of the cabin.
 

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Unless it's mast is stuck in the mud I don't think I have ever seen a keel boat floating upside down before. Does anyone have a picture of this?
 

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Unless it's mast is stuck in the mud I don't think I have ever seen a keel boat floating upside down before. Does anyone have a picture of this?
well if they loose there keel they can. I agree this is a beautiful boat, but for a trip like this beauty is likely on the bottom of the list. They do seem surprisingly good deals though, for a really nice looking boat. There are a couple of Apache's for sale in CT that look kind of promising and have really nice lines.
 

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This boat has been completely rebuilt from the keel up. It would be unlikely for it's keel to fall off.
The Comanche 42 has a semi fin keel in which 2/3 of the keel is part of the hull and the keels ballast is attached to the extreme bottom of that. Although it is possible for this piece to fall off it is unlikely to do so.
Possible, but unbelievably unlikely.
 

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I am glad he has not read this thread he might have stayed home, or at least installed .......... Those that can, do. Those that can't criticize.
 

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Discussion Starter #33
Wow... That's a bummer big time... I feel for him, twice stymied.
 
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Wow, what a kick in the ....'s. Sad news indeed.
That will be a long trip back.
Blackline does great work and Brent really knows his stuff. I wonder why it failed so soon?
Glen has had a relatively easy go of it so far.
 

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Wow, what a kick in the ....'s. Sad news indeed.
That will be a long trip back.
Blackline does great work and Brent really knows his stuff. I wonder why it failed so soon?
Glen has had a relatively easy go of it so far.
Damn, he must be gutted, and what a tough decision to have to make, but sounds as if he's made the right one...

Rich H is fond of referring to "load cycles" when speaking of rigging, and those load cycles don't come any more regularly than they would on a westabout circumnavigation...

This failure seems a compelling argument in favor of mechanical fittings, such as Sta-Loks or Hi-Mods, over swages... Or, at least carrying the makings of a backup/repair, in the way of spare fittings and wire... Had he been using Sta-Loks, with a a couple of connectors and a bit of wire, he could effect a relatively simple repair, and continue on his way...





Or, some voyagers are now going with Amsteel or Dux to serve as an emergency standing rigging replacement...

I certainly hope he doesn't let his original hope of doing this voyage non-stop, deter him from the possibility of leaving the boat in Oz until the seasons are right for a resumption of the trip next year... In my mind, that wouldn't diminish the ultimate accomplishment one bit, I've always thought the whole 'Non-stop' thing is a bit overblown, anyway... I'll raise a glass to Glenn tonight, cheers to him for having the guts to make the tough call he has...
 

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Damn, he must be gutted, and what a tough decision to have to make, but sounds as if he's made the right one...

Rich H is fond of referring to "load cycles" when speaking of rigging, and those load cycles don't come any more regularly than they would on a westabout circumnavigation...

This failure seems a compelling argument in favor of mechanical fittings, such as Sta-Loks or Hi-Mods, over swages... Or, at least carrying the makings of a backup/repair, in the way of spare fittings and wire... Had he been using Sta-Loks, with a a couple of connectors and a bit of wire, he could effect a relatively simple repair, and continue on his way...





Or, some voyagers are now going with Amsteel or Dux to serve as an emergency standing rigging replacement...

I certainly hope he doesn't let his original hope of doing this voyage non-stop, deter him from the possibility of leaving the boat in Oz until the seasons are right for a resumption of the trip next year... In my mind, that wouldn't diminish the ultimate accomplishment one bit, I've always thought the whole 'Non-stop' thing is a bit overblown, anyway... I'll raise a glass to Glenn tonight, cheers to him for having the guts to make the tough call he has...
Repairs at sea can be difficult. He has had two shrouds fail and he is heading into what will be the most difficult and dangerous part of the trip, rounding Africa.
You start to doubt everything.
It's a sad and I'm sure difficult decision to make but it is a safe decision.
His life depends on that rig.
 

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As Glenn approaches Fremantle Australia he has experience more rigging failures. Two more shrouds have shown signs of premature failure, that's four shrouds in total.
He should be in port any day now but is still dependant on his rigging to get him there as he does not have enough fuel to make it yet.
 

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Discussion Starter #38
Fingers crossed!
 

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Glenn is 20 miles out of Fremantle as I type this. A few hours at most now.

As far as the rigging, Glenn apparently did not renew the shrouds and stays before he left, although I understand he was advised to by Brent.
 
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