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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been boating for years but in a fishing boat with a motor. I sold that boat last year and missed not being able to go out on the water all summer. Now I am looking into my options for a sailboat as I always have had an interest in sailing. I would want to start out with something smaller to learn on and will be able to keep on a trailer when not in use. A little cabin would be nice but I have seen some nice boom tents around. Never actually tried them but they seem comfy enough? I will be doing my research since it's about to be winter here. Well, that's all for now, HAGO!
 

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Open boats with boom tents can be a great option if you plan to trailer the boat on a frequent basis. They are often faster than enclosed boats of a similar size because less weight is expended on the accomodations. Much like an open bass boat vs an enclosed cuddy cabin style power boat.

There are a number of small cabin boats, mostly under 20 feet than can make decent trailer sailers as well.

When it comes to trailer sailing the bigger and heavier the boat, the more of a headache it is to launch :)
 

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One of None
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Hopefully you will see the wisdom in these words.
I'm on a wooden boat forum and many people think they're going to build a boat and learn to sail but it applies universally I would say.

Good =
"Learn to sail; buy a boat"


Not so good =
Buy a boat, learn to sail
 
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Welcome from another new member. Do the research, look at some boats, and perhaps most importantly at least initially get out on some others' boats to learn the rigging, points of sale, and maneuvers, etc. in various wind speeds and conditions. In fairly short order, you'll get good idea of what you want and what will work for how, where and with whom you'll be sailing.

Cheers,

Annapolitan
 

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I have been boating for years but in a fishing boat with a motor. I sold that boat last year and missed not being able to go out on the water all summer. Now I am looking into my options for a sailboat as I always have had an interest in sailing. I would want to start out with something smaller to learn on and will be able to keep on a trailer when not in use. A little cabin would be nice but I have seen some nice boom tents around. Never actually tried them but they seem comfy enough? I will be doing my research since it's about to be winter here. Well, that's all for now, HAGO!
ARCB can answer all your questions on what makes a trailer sailer fun and easy vs a nightmare.
 

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Lake Sailor
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Dear God man he wants to actually SAIL. Just say no to these cutsie boats that don't sail for...... Or anything else in this category.

Get something that actually sails well and you will be happy. There are a ton of better sailing boats out there that will fit your criteria.

Welcome to the asylum.
 

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You may be missing the point
re-read the OP
he is not interested on performance or sailing abilities.
Just a platform to get his feet wet
sometimes we forget people want simple functional
do not see anything wrong with that
he will learn the basics on his own, as he wants, no courses, no ASA, no yacht clubs to meet sailors, just get the floating thing and try, many of us have done just done that and worked fine.
 

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Lake Sailor
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You may be missing the point
re-read the OP
he is not interested on performance or sailing abilities.
Just a platform to get his feet wet
sometimes we forget people want simple functional
do not see anything wrong with that
he will learn the basics on his own, as he wants, no courses, no ASA, no yacht clubs to meet sailors, just get the floating thing and try, many of us have done just done that and worked fine.
I did, he did not mention anything you say. He wants advice, I gave him some. There are an order of magnitude better boats out there. A WWP, is not something to taint your vision of sailing on. Hell, an old O'Day might even be better but, not much. Used to own one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
A bit confused by the posts concerning the O'Day and the West Wight Potter. I see that there are conflicting opinions and wonder if we can discuss it without getting in too heated of a debate. Rather than just saying they are not good boats it would be nice to know why? From my bit of research online so far they have constantly been very popular. WWP is called "Unsinkable" do to the positive floatation and often called an excellent beginner sailboat. One or the other are on almost every list that comes up with top daysailers, dinghy sailers, trailerable sailboats or beginner sailboats, etc.
I actually almost grabbed a Daysailer recently because it seemed like a great deal but someone beat me to it. I also like the open boats like Albacore and Wayfarer. Just not sure how to research if these lists are made up by the manufacturers trying to persuade people new to sailing? (Besides on here of course) I also can add that I am in the great lakes area so probably won't be doing any ocean or costal sailing in my first boat! Thanks for any clarifications! :)
 

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great questions
why did I bring up the WWP?
When started sailing, ran across an article about a young couple with very young children that embarked on a journey to explore every possible lake in the USA.
Remember they had a VW Bus, they will pitch a tent at night and cannot remember if the kids or the couple will sleep in the tent.
I thought it was a wonderful story.
Since we also have very young kids thought about it.
It had a good initial stability due to his hull design, almost no risk of turning over or capsize on normal winds and low sail area, seemed like the perfect boat for an inexperienced learning person that will allow wide range of mistakes without getting into troubles.
Sits low on a trailer, and could be tow without much trouble
Because of my work, could not take that much time off and eventually decided against, since will not be trailing a boat.
Still think it is a nice, functional boat.
We started with a Ventura 23 pop up with a retractable board and continue moving up in size as our needs dictated.
 

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@Scorpioguy8 I have direct experience with each of the boats you listed above, either having sailed them myself, or having sailed alongside of them in an event. I think each of those boats is a good boat in it's own way. These are just personal opinions though...

West Wight Potter 15, as mentioned above is no speed demon, but it does have a usable cabin and is very easy to sail from a trailer. The boat is very light, the rig is light and simple. The boat is light enough to be launched from a beach like a dinghy, except that it has a cabin, which is kind of cool. I know a guy who sailed his with no engine from Tampa to Key Largo, 300 coastal miles in 5 days, 6 hours, so he was averaging 60 miles made good a day (with a buddy). That isn't bad. The boat is still in production and has been since 1979. That also isn't bad.

Day Sailer 17. My Dad had one he sailed on Lake Temagami in Canada. It also is not a speed demon, but has respectable sailing performance, certainly faster than a Potter 15. It is a very forgiving boat, performance stays pretty good as the weather starts to go down hill. Depending on the age of the Daysailer, some have a pretty usable cabin if you want to sleep aboard. DS 17 has been in continual production since 1956 though design has been updated and changed over the last 60+ years

Wayfarer and it's various clones might be considered the bench mark cruising dinghy quick, forgiving and relatively sea worthy. The older Mark one models are pretty good for sleeping aboard under a boom tent, newer models have sacrificed some storage space to buoyancy tanks. CL 16 is a commonly vailable Wayfarer clone in north America. I would say a Wayfarer is faster than a DS 17. Wayfarer and it' clones have been in continuous production since 1957, though I am not sure new ones are built in North American any more. C & L Boat works was producing clones in Canada until fairly recently.

I sailed Albacors on Lake Ontario while I was doing my CanSail dinghy courses in the 80s. It's more of a racing boat, probably the fastest of the bunch, but also the least forgiving of the bunch, it would be low on my list as a camping boat. They do have one thing going for them, at least around here, they are a popular one design racer and are plentiful and cheap, I see them being given away in fixable condition from time to time, and used parts are common. Unlike the others above, I don't think I have seen an outboard mounted on an Albacore.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Thanks for clearing things up! :) I guess I wasn't very exact on what I was looking for other than trailerable and beginner friendly. Like I mentioned afterwards, mostly will be for lakes and rivers so not too bad with the waves. I would like to be able to camp with 2 but enough room for 4 people for the day (fishing mostly) would be nice. I prefer the ability to attach a small gas or electric motor mostly for at the dock (hopefully! Wind don't fail me now!) I wouldn't mind messing around for fun on a rental Sunfish or Hobbie sometimes but not something I want to do everytime I go out. In general a little wet is fine just not soaked everytime I go out! 🌂Lol! If there is anything else you can think of to help narrow down the search, let me know. Thanks again for all the help so far!
 

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Of the boats listed, I would say any would be workable for camping for 2.

For fishing for 4 adults? I think the Wayfarer or DS17 would be the way I would go. Both have big cockpits and good load carrying for their size. Both are rated to carry up to 6 adults (would be cozy though).

Either could be powered by an electric motor or small gas motor, which would be pretty much needed for river sailing.

Both DS's and Wayfarers see some pretty hard use.

Book you could check out Ocean Going Wayfarer to Iceland and Norway.

On Youtube 4000 Miles in a Wayfarer Dinghy. Greece-Egypt, Nike and back.

Also on Youtube Dinghy Sailing in Labrador. They took a DS17 to the Torngat Mountains, northern tip of Labrador.

For dinghy camping in general, The Dinghy Cruising Companion. Has ideas on building your own boom tent, galley, sleeping accommodations etc.
 
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