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Open boats with boom tents can be a great option if you plan to trailer the boat on a frequent basis. They are often faster than enclosed boats of a similar size because less weight is expended on the accomodations. Much like an open bass boat vs an enclosed cuddy cabin style power boat.

There are a number of small cabin boats, mostly under 20 feet than can make decent trailer sailers as well.

When it comes to trailer sailing the bigger and heavier the boat, the more of a headache it is to launch :)
 

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@Scorpioguy8 I have direct experience with each of the boats you listed above, either having sailed them myself, or having sailed alongside of them in an event. I think each of those boats is a good boat in it's own way. These are just personal opinions though...

West Wight Potter 15, as mentioned above is no speed demon, but it does have a usable cabin and is very easy to sail from a trailer. The boat is very light, the rig is light and simple. The boat is light enough to be launched from a beach like a dinghy, except that it has a cabin, which is kind of cool. I know a guy who sailed his with no engine from Tampa to Key Largo, 300 coastal miles in 5 days, 6 hours, so he was averaging 60 miles made good a day (with a buddy). That isn't bad. The boat is still in production and has been since 1979. That also isn't bad.

Day Sailer 17. My Dad had one he sailed on Lake Temagami in Canada. It also is not a speed demon, but has respectable sailing performance, certainly faster than a Potter 15. It is a very forgiving boat, performance stays pretty good as the weather starts to go down hill. Depending on the age of the Daysailer, some have a pretty usable cabin if you want to sleep aboard. DS 17 has been in continual production since 1956 though design has been updated and changed over the last 60+ years

Wayfarer and it's various clones might be considered the bench mark cruising dinghy quick, forgiving and relatively sea worthy. The older Mark one models are pretty good for sleeping aboard under a boom tent, newer models have sacrificed some storage space to buoyancy tanks. CL 16 is a commonly vailable Wayfarer clone in north America. I would say a Wayfarer is faster than a DS 17. Wayfarer and it' clones have been in continuous production since 1957, though I am not sure new ones are built in North American any more. C & L Boat works was producing clones in Canada until fairly recently.

I sailed Albacors on Lake Ontario while I was doing my CanSail dinghy courses in the 80s. It's more of a racing boat, probably the fastest of the bunch, but also the least forgiving of the bunch, it would be low on my list as a camping boat. They do have one thing going for them, at least around here, they are a popular one design racer and are plentiful and cheap, I see them being given away in fixable condition from time to time, and used parts are common. Unlike the others above, I don't think I have seen an outboard mounted on an Albacore.
 

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Of the boats listed, I would say any would be workable for camping for 2.

For fishing for 4 adults? I think the Wayfarer or DS17 would be the way I would go. Both have big cockpits and good load carrying for their size. Both are rated to carry up to 6 adults (would be cozy though).

Either could be powered by an electric motor or small gas motor, which would be pretty much needed for river sailing.

Both DS's and Wayfarers see some pretty hard use.

Book you could check out Ocean Going Wayfarer to Iceland and Norway.

On Youtube 4000 Miles in a Wayfarer Dinghy. Greece-Egypt, Nike and back.

Also on Youtube Dinghy Sailing in Labrador. They took a DS17 to the Torngat Mountains, northern tip of Labrador.

For dinghy camping in general, The Dinghy Cruising Companion. Has ideas on building your own boom tent, galley, sleeping accommodations etc.
 

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There are pro's and cons to totally open boats. A dinghy with a foredeck has dry storage and may need less bailing because you are not taking as many waves over the bow.

There are a couple of work arounds to getting the jib down on open water on a decked dinghy or beach cat.

The simplest and most cost effective is a jib down haul. It's a rope tied to the head of the sail, runs down the forestay to a turning block then back to the cockpit. This allows for easy jib dowsing from the cockpit. I have this system on 2 of my boats.

Roller furling is more expensive, but a bit tidier. This is the same system as used for roller furling genoas on large sailboats but smaller. They can be purchased on line.

Cat rig. These are boats that are designed to sail pretty well without a jib. The main is bigger and placed further forward. My other 3 boats use this system.
 
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